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  1. Yesterday
  2. kotmj

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    Seems pretty typical to me. Here are two Momotaros.
  3. takashi

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    Rear pockets seem really deep?
  4. Last week
  5. kotmj

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    Sava on a customer. He put it on just 2 minutes before the picture was taken, so the jeans has not yet expanded from the stress of being worn. The main reason he went for bespoke jeans is to accommodate his large calves. Even so, there is only half an inch of ease in the calves here, though it looks roomier than that.
  6. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    My assistant's first canvas. I sometimes make the canvas in the shop instead of letting the coatmaker handle it because there are special requirements to the canvas. It may have to have a certain shape, it may have to be stiffer, or it may have to be lighter, etc.
  7. NoName

    The suiting thread

    https://www.mauldineconomics.com/frontlinethoughts/your-pension-may-be-monetized
  8. kotmj

    The watch appreciation thread

    Just watched "Last Breath" on Netflix. It's a documentary about a saturation diver who, while on a job, had his umbilical severed. You get to see the world of saturation diving. I saw a G-shock and an Omega Seamaster Professional being worn by the crew.
  9. "6"

    The suiting thread

    Perhaps there is relevance still for pidgin English in our modern society today
  10. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Having a worker in the shop is great. So useful. Even if I have to keep explaining myself. I'm wondering if I should hire a second one. Eventually, jacket baste making will be on-site (in the shop). Then, jacket making will be on-site. I learn her father owns the company that manufactures Lot 10, a chewable fruit-flavoured gums widely distributed at Watson's and Guardian etc. Big capitalist.
  11. Earlier
  12. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    A pretty significant annoyance when dealing with the young, Chinese-system educated people who work for me is how they never seem to understand what I'm saying. "Do a sparse zigzag," I would say. They'd have no clue what I mean. I would then have to explain to them the meaning of "sparse". Every other sentence I utter, there are one or more words whose meaning I have to make clear. I could also say "low density zigzag", but then I'd have to explain what density means. There is no way around it. I have to keep explaining myself.
  13. kotmj

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    For the first time ever in the history of sava, somebody called about having jeans made. I told him we just started and are not that good at it yet. He seemed interested nonetheless.
  14. kotmj

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    Clearly, the watch pocket needs to better positioned. The belt loops, too, are not supposed to be positioned in such a way. The trousermaker needs to be schooled about these things. He also needs to better understand where to initiate and terminate a stitch. Definitely not at the front, where the nest of threads becomes painfully obvious. The bartack is hand sewn. After a disastrously bad buttonhole preparation (the steps of machine sewing around the buttonhole and perforating the buttonhole in preparation for the buttonhole stitch) by my employee, she then spent the next 1 hour sewing the first 20% of this buttonhole. I found her too slow and the results barely acceptable. She then complained about the inadequate buttonhole prep and how the buttonhole is doomed to failure. I told her all these problems are her problem. I have no problem. To prove my point, I picked up where she left off. 10 minutes later, I have completed the buttonhole, including the bartack. This is to show her what I expect with regards to speed and excellence. It also completely shut her up. She did a much better job with the bartacks.
  15. kotmj

    The watch appreciation thread

    Brand new strap by Zulu Leather. So, so happy. It is a very good strap. This is different from the previous strap Zulu made for me in that it tapers to a 16mm buckle as opposed to a 18mm buckle. Because a small watch needs a more slender strap. The stitches are now also tone-on-tone with the leather.
  16. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    It suddenly occurred to me how I want to expose the EPF scam. I tell Claire Rewcastle Brown about it.
  17. kotmj

    The watch appreciation thread

    My Datejust finally gets some wear. I don't even know why I would bother with other watches---this is the perfect watch! It feels so native on my wrist. I'm wearing it on a navy Nato which I tie with an alternative method I found on youtube which eliminates the bulk you normally see with nato.
  18. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Unfortunately, this sort of pick stitching is not something I can currently do on production jackets. It's like one of those techniques on a dish that a chef can do in his experimental kitchen, but which he cannot roll out across his global chain of fine dining restaurants because the people he hires to staff those restaurants are not like him.
  19. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    I saw some images on IG of a very different kind of pick stitching done by the Italians. Traditionally, pick stitching is meant to be ultra discreet---preferably invisible. Its function was to keep the edges of garments thin and defined. However, when executed by warm bodies, the pick stitch manifests itself as dotted puckerings. I gave these some thought and experimented briefly myself and now know there are three variables to the pick stitch: thickness of thread, rapidity of execution, and spacing. I realised the Italians were using thick silk buttonhole twist, they were doing it on ultra low tension (therefore very slowly) and the spacing was tight. If you do it fast, you put too much force on the thread, causing it to sink into the cloth, which creates a pucker. You have to gently pull the needle through and not let the thread sink into the cloth from excessive tension. Yesterday, I got my assistant to do the pick stitching on a jacket as an experiment. You see her doing it in the picture above. Instead of dotted puckerings, you get little pearls of silk with no puckering. Exactly like some of the Italians. However, it takes a whole day and a lot of expensive silk thread.
  20. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    So there you have it: the answer to the permanency of the so-called ironwork. Ironwork (also known as "Dressur" in German and presumably French), for those new to the term, is the local stretching or shrinking of the cloth done with the iron. It is a technique to further enhance both the ergonomics and the appearance of the garment. There is at least one contemporary German author of a tailoring textbook working in France who insists that ironwork is permanent. I just don't know what is wrong with him. If it were, there would be no puckering on a jacket. Ironwork is relatively long lived if you live in certain parts of the world with low relative humidity. It lasts maybe 0.5 days if you live here. There is a trend towards ever less ironwork in garments. There are even some methods called "dressurlos", or ironwork-free. This is driven mostly by the thinness and the compactness of cloths today which discourage ironwork.
  21. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    How a Liverano looks like in the tropics. Swipe to see more wrinkles.
  22. kotmj

    Coffee

    Coffee the Rubinacci way
  23. kotmj

    The watch appreciation thread

    Wow, I need green suede so bad in my life
  24. kotmj

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    Another jeans back from the trousermaker. This one is for a deputy public prosecutor.
  25. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Sometime early last year, or maybe earlier, I told a coatmaker I'm firing him. Then I fired him. He has two problems, one of which led to a third problem. His two problems: a) The inability to mount sleeves successfully. He was terrible at it. He was OK if I allowed him to draft the sleeve crown-armscye, but at JT that area is done the JT way, not the coatmaker's way. He had no clue how to mount sleeves drafted by me. His way of drafting it was also not something I could accept. He would CHANGE my sleeves so he could mount them. I told him if he does that one more time I will fire him. He did it again. So I fired him. b) Lack of talent at buttonholes. His lack of talent at buttonholes led to his feigning not to understand what I want, though I made very clear what I want. You cannot feign anything with me. He executes other portions of the jacket very well. He is also a fast worker, unlike some of the semi-retirees who work for me. I'm thinking of re-engaging him. He makes the bodice of the jacket. He makes the sleeves, but does not attach them to the bodice. No buttonholes. He sends the parts to me and I have another coatmaker mount the sleeves and a finisher do the buttonholes. Obviously he gets paid less per jacket. This way, I gain more capacity.
  26. kotmj

    The watch appreciation thread

    My lovely Rolex. So gentle in conveying the time, so light and small and sculptural.
  27. kotmj

    The Denim (contrast) Thread

    I have just put in a mega order of 14 different types of denim enough to make 41 pairs of jeans. Some of them are very interesting. Like this one, which looks like donegal tweed (but isn't). By Nisshinbo. Or how about this 78% cotton, 22% hemp by Nihon Menpu? There is even such a creature. I wonder how it fades. By Kuroki. And everybody needs a jeans in raw unbleached, undyed cotton. By Kurabo.
  28. kotmj

    The watch appreciation thread

    That fact is not lost on me, but is ultimately inconsequential as I can't afford it.
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