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  1. Yesterday
  2. vrp

    The suiting thread

    The talent acquisition department at JT Global has done a fine job.
  3. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    You're looking at the crotch of a trousers that used to have sacrificial barrier patches sewn in. I think someone used a Super 150's or something for the patches, because they have been abraded to nothing. Not only that, the trouser cloth has also ripped. What is not visible is that the cloth has also ripped at the seams. I gave this to the Malay boy. Do something, I said. A few hours later...
  4. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Current state of mess at JT's covid hibernation place. We haven't completed moving in yet.
  5. Last week
  6. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    I think despite all my flaws as a hiring manager, I seem to get one thing right: I have a good record of hiring born craftspeople. My previous four hires have turned out to be real craftspeople. Not that many people are born as craftspeople. For instance, I've noticed that some people have trepidation engaging with the physical world. They feel more comfortable looking at a picture of a cloth on their phones than the physical cloth in front of them. When I hold up a jacket to their face to show them a feature of it, they almost shirk away from it. They prefer ogling it on Instagram or Pinterest. They find real things to be foreign. Well anyway, what I want to say is that I'm discovering the Malay boy to be quite the craftsperson. Next week, I have a fashion design student from JB coming for an internship interview. I shall have to figure out what sort of a person he is. Court mandarin, or gardener? I think what I'm looking for in an employee is that he/she be a craftsperson, and be mindful who the customer is. I'm the customer. I'm trading with the employee. They should see themselves as freelancers, with me being their biggest client. The problem I had with my previous two employees is that they never saw themselves as trading with me. They have never really traded with anyone. They were never in the open economy. They saw me as a sort of headmaster or something. Being in educational institutions is all they ever knew. I did not like trading with them. I kept feeling I was trying to trade with kindergarten children.
  7. "6"

    Dress shoes

    No. A local fine shoe retailer in Melbourne. The Alden ppl appreciate your compliment jajaja. More pics work in progress. Pyjamas (i.e. my work from home attire) don't make for very impactful / #menswear quality pics.
  8. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    At the Awana Horse Ranch, which is really just a deserted, rundown place in Gohtong Jaya halfway up Genting Highlands, Frenzy the German Shepherd found and chased a squirrel. As you can see, the squirrel lost. Another one of my dogs, Grey, fought Frenzy for the prize. Grey had the top half of the squirrel in its jaws; Frenzy had the bottom half. The squirrel tore in two. Grey with the top half of the squirrel. Grey belonged to an Indian farmer next to my house. He obtained Grey to guard his farm. But Grey preferred to hang around my house. He eventually stayed; he never went back to the Indian farmer. Bottom half of squirrel before being consumed by a highly pedigreed working line German Shepherd.
  9. thelibran

    Dress shoes

    Nice...need more pictures!!
  10. takashi

    Dress shoes

    WJ&co?
  11. "6"

    Dress shoes

    All these sale events encouraging thoughtless consumption, terrible really. On the flipside, support local businesses and all that. Alden Indy in snuff suede.
  12. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Trouser finishing
  13. Earlier
  14. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Why put it off till tomorrow. Family life very overrated. Work from morning till night. Like your grandparents from China.
  15. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Maybe I'll shoot a balcony pic tomorrow
  16. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    If you talk to an 18-year old with an IQ of, say 140, you get the feeling of talking to a 30-year old.
  17. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    I noticed that I described Employee #2 as "unbelievably childish" in my post higher up the page. I thought to myself, "like a 15-year old boy in a 24-year old body". I remember a policeman telling me at the end of our encounter after Employee #2 was caught with some ganja, that this employee of mine is "budak lagi". Aren't these descriptions of developmental retardation? That is to say, a person is not as psychologically developed as their age peers are. Developmentally retarded = retarded What I should look out for in my search for future workers is how they are psychologically relative to their age. Do they sound "old" relative to their age? Or are they childish? I would be looking for people who---relative to their age---have a more complete model of how the world works, have a larger vocabulary, are able to look at an issue from more angles/perspectives, can describe a thing or situation with greater resolution, etc. After I am done talking to him/her, I want to feel that I've talked to someone older that what his/her age would indicate. But maybe I'm expecting too much. This is, after all, the tailoring industry. One where almost everybody is stupid.
  18. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    There is simply no salvation for dumb people. Even those with IQ 106 would resign from their positions in the middle of the deepest recession thinking they would receive an improved offer. Lol. Neurotypicals.
  19. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    1) 40 minutes 2) Yes. Notice I also introduced myself with my name, which she can readily Google.
  20. Cyborg

    The suiting thread

    I am a little curious: 1) what was the time interval between him applying and you contacting him? 2) was your company name stated in the advert? (I assume so)
  21. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    The travails of dealing with IQ 90 neurotypicals
  22. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    What neurotypicals fail to appreciate is that not everybody is neurotypical. Especially when they are dealing with those on the autism spectrum disorder (Asperger's Syndrome, etc.), they are shocked to discover that these neurodivergents are not purely opportunistic. Oftentimes, they act based on values and principles, even when it costs them to do so. Moral sensitivity is a trait of gifted people. They have a strong sense of social justice, of fairness. This always catches the neurotypicals by surprise.
  23. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Since I'm seated at a PC now, which happens increasingly infrequently, I may as well give an update on developments at JT. Employee #2 is out. He was with JT for a year. After the first 4 months or so, I started noticing he is fundamentally different from me. As in, fundamentally less effective, fundamentally less intelligent, and very given to all sorts of addictions and compulsive behaviors. In reality, he only worked for 9 months or so since there was an MCO in there. Many of his actions make no sense to me; they are injurious to his own interests and reflect compulsion-based action rather than reflection-based action. At the end, I came to the conclusion I cannot trust him with any task that I wouldn't trust a Downs Syndrome child with. The only job he can hold is a factory-operator type job. A cognitively simple, scope-limited, and repetitive job. His behaviours are also unbelievably childish. I offered him two options. One, he transitions to a piecework remuneration. Two, he leaves in 2 months. I gave him 24 hours to decide. He decided to leave. I am pessimistic about his prospects in life. I know more about the nature of his being than I am comfortable writing about here (because it is very unflattering); what I can see gives me little hope he will succeed to any meaningful degree in life. Sensing the leverage she has now that Employee #2 is leaving, Employee #1 thought it was a good idea to hand in her resignation letter. She probably thought that as the sole remaining direct employee, I would persuade her to stay by making her a better offer. I did nothing of that sort. I do not negotiate with terrorists. So, last month, she left. She adopted a vengeful, scorched-earth policy in the weeks leading to her departure. She was very disagreeable, and conspired with Employee #2 to undermine the operations of the company. As the two were serving their 2-month notice periods, the Malay boy had come on board. He was the recipient of extremely unwelcoming behaviour especially by Employee #1, who poured her scorn on him. He is now the sole direct employee at JT. He is on a piecework remuneration system---the same system Employee #2 rejected. He is doing well on it. In attitude, he is far more mature. He is totally not "strawberry". I had no real problem with Employee #1. She would still be here if she hadn't resigned. I have so far worked with 4 fashion design graduates; two as employees and two interns. I had interviewed several for potential vacancies at JT. I had met with two Head of Programme in fashion design from local colleges. I looked at many resumes of fashion designers who applied for positions at JT. I come to the following conclusion: The smartest fashion design graduate is dumber than the dumbest mechanical engineering graduate. This observation is from a purely personal perspective. When I was a student (in mechanical engineering), the people around me were smart as hell. What I notice about most people is the inability to even weakly simulate the future based on present actions. This is an ability that only a minute percentage of the population has. The other development is that JT has moved premises. I kept wanting to move to the 2500 sq. ft. space facing the lake at Plaza Kelana Jaya, but the precipitous fall in demand due to the CMCO and the very uncertain future made me decide for hibernation instead. So we are now in a smaller unit within the same building. I only signed a 12-month rental agreement for this unit. I hope to move to Plaza Kelana Jaya before that agreement expires.
  24. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    It occurred to me having typed the above that I see myself being in tailoring into my 60s. In reality, I see myself doing this indefinitely. I believe this is true of many self employed/business-owning tailors. When a tailor switches to doing something different, it's often because they can't make a living in tailoring. I also believe this is true for many owner-operated businesses. They will tell you they see themselves doing what they do indefinitely. But why can't employees bear the thought of such a fate? Ask any employee if they see themselves doing what they do till old, and the very thought gives them a depressive episode which may require medical intervention.
  25. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    Yesterday, I braved the scourge and drove to a blighted town to pick up something I've always wanted to have but did not have the justification for. I bought a tabletop steam generator aka boiler. It belonged to a dobby in Sri Hartamas which shuttered during MCO. The proprietor moved it to her mother's house in Klang. The more observant of you people may have noticed a freestanding twin iron steam generator in my pictures of the workshop. Alas, it doesn't work. A heating element needed replacing. So this is the first time I have a working steam generator. All shirt and trouser makers have steam generators. It is absolutely essential to their work. But only a minority of coatmakers own one in Malaysia. The majority use gravity feed irons. Many even just use dry irons. They use an improvised dauber to apply water to the parts they want to press. I once asked a coatmaker why he doesn't use a boiler. This is a guy who loves equipment. In fact, he asked me to buy for him a gold Wilkinson shear (about rm1k). He says: Too much steam! It wets the garment too much. I just need a touch of steam. But in all pictures of European tailors, I see the single-iron tabletop boiler. The table top boiler became very interesting to me from a work safety and ergonomy perspective. I once went with the whole team to visit a husband-wife coatmaking setup at their house. Wonderful people. I saw the husband's gravity feed iron with its water reservoir high up above the work table. You climb on the table to fill it? I asked. Yes, he said. You have to make sure the ceiling fan doesn't hit your head, he added. I thought that when I'm in my 60s, I never want to clamber onto my working table to fill the water reservoir of an iron, all while being mindful of the ceiling fan hitting my head.
  26. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    I just participated in a Nielsen survey on behalf of Nestle for their Nespresso business. It involves answering many very thoughtful questions. Obviously, the questions were prepared by an intellectually gifted person. One question went along the lines of: Who bought the Nespresso maker you use at work? a) the office bought it b) I bought it for my use in the office c) I use a colleague's machine d) a group of colleagues bought the machine etc. Nowhere was there the option of: I bought it for the use of the whole office, because I'm the boss. Somehow, the otherwise very smart person who created the survey did not imagine that a business owner would be taking the survey. I think he/she is just an employee.
  27. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    I think most of you have no idea how a plant based diet actually makes you feel. You feel totally different from meat eaters. Meat causes a great deal of systemic inflammation. You think it's normal to be chronically systemically inflamed. After all, you've never known anything else. All kinds of subtle or not so subtle discomforts in the body. A slightly depressed mood. When your body has no systemic inflammation, it feels cool and calm. Your mind is calm and quietly cheerful. It's a body sensation like that of a cucumber. Just a cool feeling throughout the body.
  28. kotmj

    The suiting thread

    I had always felt that something was wrong with the way the food I ate interacted with my body. Then, many years ago, I tried going starch-based for 3 weeks. I felt 10 years younger and my mood was much brighter. I kept on with the diet, eating lots of starches and vegetables. A few years later, I became insulin-resistant. It sort of crept up on me. I then went oil-free. Immediately, the fatigue disappeared and I felt incredibly energetic. It remained so. I am today very particular about the oil content of stuff I put in my mouth. About 3 years ago, I hired my first dispatch boy. He did all the legwork, while I remained in the shop. This meant I rarely went out into the afternoon sun anymore. I then developed a Vitamin D deficiency. My sleep was shallow. I would wake up poorly rested. I was constantly fatigued. I went to the pharmacy, and consumed 6000 IU in one mouthful. That night, I slept deeply like I've not in years. Since then, I've always slept very well. I go out into the afternoon sun shirtless whenever I can, which in practice is maybe 3x a week. I supplement with D3 at about 1000 IU daily. Oral D3 has a much better effect than subcutaneous D3. I think we were meant to ingest it. About a month ago, I started taking creatine. Holy moly, it gives me so much vitality. Last week, I bought some Vitamin B12. Mecobalamin. I started taking 1.5g daily (three doses a day). I feel amazing. I thought the creatine would be the pinnacle, but the B12 really upped my energy levels. I now feel better than any other time in my life. So I eat brown rice, sweet potatoes, potatoes, yams, wholewheat bread, oat porridge, pasta and white rice. I eat about a cup of legumes a day. I eat lots of green vegetables. Twice a week, I eat a steamed kembong/mabong. It's supposed to give me all the marine nutrients like iodine and omega such and such, while keeping heavy metals exposure low. (Avoid tenggiri, for instance). Kembong is one level up the food chain from plankton. Twice a week, I eat a serving of steamed NZ lamb. I started this after observing the effects of creatine. If taking creatine makes me feel so much better, then surely we were evolved to consume it, instead of relying on our bodies to manufacture it. Ergo, humans were meant to eat animals. But not with anything like the frequency people do today, and not with the poor quality of the animals consumed today. NZ lamb is pasture grazed. You've heard of grass fed beef. Well, NZ lamb is by default grass fed. The animals are outdoors the whole time. The same is not true for Australian lamb, or for mutton of unspecified origin, which were by default fed goat pellets. Similarly, pigs are fed pig pellets. Most pig pellets are imported from China. Not even the pig farmer knows what is in the pellet. Let's not talk about chickens.
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