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I don't know where this should go; there doesn't seem to be a suitable sub-forum. I'll let kotmj decide!

 

I was wondering what people do for exercise here. While tailors can certainly enhance and compensate for physical shortcomings, ultimately they are not plastic surgeons. Alas, the hard work must either be done by the scalpel or at the gym. So what do people here do to make sure they still fit their commissions years down the road? Unleash your inner 'broscientist' and educate your fellow Kerbaus on how to stoke that metabolic fire.

 

I've tried various programs over the years, from boxing to endurance running. Right now I'm doing the Starting Strength program, which is a pretty old-fashioned bar-bell training program. It seems to be highly effective in muscle mass gain, provided you're eating and resting properly. I've also found boxing (or other high-intensity workouts) to be useful for fat loss and getting 'cut', although the intensity of the workout means you have to be rather well prepared before each one.

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If you are talking solely about increasing metabolism/losing weight, I've found that high intensity interval training has been the most effective cardio training method for myself. I've tried normal jogging/running, swimming, rope jumping as well.

 

What I used to do:

1) Stretch for 2 mins.

2) Warm up walk for 2 mins.

3) Sprint really hard for 1 min.

4) Brisk walk for 2 mins.

5) Repeat steps 3 and 4 until I turn blue.

 

Not for the faint hearted, but it gets the work done in the shortest amount of time.

 

This + low carb diet, and I saw drastic results within 1 month.

 

If you are talking about getting ripped/cut, try reading books by Pavel Tsatsouline. He educates on the various muscle twitching and muscle tension which gives that ripped look.

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I gained 8 kg on Starting Strength. This was maybe 3 years ago. (I'm essentially back at square 1 now that I'm sedentary.) I also cut on a sprinting program -- it works very well and I found that I loved sprinting. Sprinting is the exact opposite of jogging. Humans were never made to jog -- it destroys your knees and is an inefficient way to burn calories.

 

Sprinting is something you do when you chase prey or try to outrun a predator. The act of sprinting feels very natural. Keep it down to 45 seconds max per sprint.

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Better to swim than to jog. I also did HIIT swimming in my previous job when the Friday lunch break was 1 hour 45 minutes and my condo had a pool that nobody used . Loved it too.

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interval training is the way to go, to keep your metabolism at a high rate (even after you've finished your workout).

 

and as mentioned, you don't need to spend a huge amount of time at the gym.

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If you are talking solely about increasing metabolism/losing weight, I've found that high intensity interval training has been the most effective cardio training method for myself. I've tried normal jogging/running, swimming, rope jumping as well.

 

What I used to do:

1) Stretch for 2 mins.

2) Warm up walk for 2 mins.

3) Sprint really hard for 1 min.

4) Brisk walk for 2 mins.

5) Repeat steps 3 and 4 until I turn blue.

 

Not for the faint hearted, but it gets the work done in the shortest amount of time.

 

This + low carb diet, and I saw drastic results within 1 month.

 

If you are talking about getting ripped/cut, try reading books by Pavel Tsatsouline. He educates on the various muscle twitching and muscle tension which gives that ripped look.

 

That is a very good suggestion. I hate swimming, gym and jogging, and no tennis since I have hurt my back some years back.

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Joonian,

 

I got married... which was how I discovered this forum. Yes, I'm one of the culprits doing desktop research on suits 1 month before the wedding. :P

 

As effective as HIIT may be, to me it was a workout driven by vanity and not by passion/interest. There was no sustenance to this, because as soon as results were achieved in the mirror, complacency kicks in.

 

If I may add further, wearing the right running shoes and learning the proper running gait will help in reducing injuries.

 

Petepan,

 

On a separate subject matter, I would recommend you to consider QiGong - corrective healing for your bad back.

http://www.wellnessmedicalqigong.com/

I sprained my LCL (knee) earlier this year and was suggested by my then boss to try this. I limped in as a sceptic and I ran out a firm believer.

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Noname: Yes, that's why I only did boxing for HIIT. Without the art and the group pressure (I subscribe to peer pressure only in limited scenarios!), it would be impossible for me to push myself with such intensity.

 

Kotmj: Never read 'Born to Run'? The thesis is the exact opposite of yours, and he has some compelling evidence to back it up. But I totally agree that endurance running is not the best way to lose calories... people have to go into it knowing what they're getting. Unfortunately this usually isn't the case, and it leads to some frustrated people.

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interesting that the tarahumara consume corn beer as a way to fuel their ultramarathons.

 

interesting also that humans are supposedly very good at long distance running because we have the ability to sweat (among other things).

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I'm trying out this workout called 6 Pack Short Cuts. It always advertised on your search bar (honestly thought it was some MLM bullshit). The video are quite amateurish, i was extremely skeptical. But their work out programs are quite intense when you do the thing then you realise there is no such thing as short cut. The diet is good but something that is really hard to apply in this part of the world. I like the workouts its time based its short and intense. Gym time is bout 30m and prob add another 30m for warm ups.

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do let us know how it works out for you, zinzan. i've been quite curious about it myself, especially when the guy claims that it's very easy to apply (on the diet part, more so than the exercise part).

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When going on Low Carb Diets, I would suggest to stay away from extremely high intense workouts unless you are pretty experienced with training. Main reason is that

 

Low carb if done properly will shift energy system to fat as fuel - Fat is consumed as fuel at low RER's . Low RER is usually acheived at low intensity exercise/resting. So basically in a nutshell when you are sitting down watching tv you are using fat as fuel. In a way la.

 

Try circuit training. They would work. Swing by rosstraining.com and look up some nice routine. But tweak to adjust to your ability/capacity.

 

Slow steady cardio does the trick as well. Do it fasted. Back in undergrad i remember writing a paper about low intensity workouts and fat consumption/caloric expenditure. Remember that your body adapts quickly tho so always include variation. I'd swim if i know how but yeah too bad i cant. :P

 

:D

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Shanecross: So if on low carb diet you would recommend slow steady (aerobic?) cardio + (aerobic?) circuit training? What would the overall effect be... weight loss or fat loss or muscle gain?

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Shanecross: So if on low carb diet you would recommend slow steady (aerobic?) cardio + (aerobic?) circuit training? What would the overall effect be... weight loss or fat loss or muscle gain?

 

It depends on the individual. For example, you can get up in the morning, smack on a cup of black coffee with no sugar and walk on the treadmill for like 45mins at 5km/h @ 7-8% gradient. Then maybe you can head over to the stepper and do something at low intensity as well. When circuit training, perhaps keep it short and simple. Wanna get the heart pumping and condition yourself too. So something like... 10 box jumps, Renegade rows and 30 jumping jacks. Repeat for 6 sets. Something like that la.

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Hi all. This is my first post here, after visiting anonymously a couple of times. Great forum! I hope it is not inappropriate if I share my recent personal experience with low carb/exercise for weight loss with you - you may have a similar story to mine.

 

My lifestyle is fairly sedentary, since I work from home on a PC and no longer have a dog that needs walking. At 1.75m and 77kg, I had a BMI of about 26.5, putting me about a third of the way into the 'overweight' category. Worst of all, it was mostly belly fat - I didn't feel or look fit.

 

I hunted around for information and experiences regarding weight loss,conscious of the fact that by nature I will take the path of least resistance - no special shopping destinations and no circuit training for me. I'm not a very good swimmer, although I'm OK at sinking, and I have posture related back pain. So that's a few things written off straight away (I will mention, however, that prior to the back trouble I trained for a while in Gracie Jiu Jitsu, which gives a very intense workout for the major muscle groups, as well as being great fun. MMA offers a similar experience, but with more aerobic 'fast twitch' muscle stimulation).

 

What I started with was an alternate-day fasting regimen, whereby one eats between zero and 20% of one's calorific RDI, and takes in plenty of fluids, and then lets loose the following day. The logic here is that one is unlikely to overeat on 'feeder' days, so the net calorie intake over a week or so is a deficit.

 

I combined this with a regular pre-breakfast walk (low impact, since I like my knees just fine as they are) over a 5.8 km route. I walk pretty briskly, so I cover this distance in 45-50 minutes. Apparently that puts me on a par with 'power-walkers', which ought to give me bragging rights at the gym. Or the bar.

 

I found this very effective - the weight came off at about a kilo a week, but it was tough to fast while the family were having delicious cooked meals right under my nose. I had to become somewhat ascetic and masochistic in my outlook, and I didn't feel this was sustainable in the long term.

 

However, I had been inspired by the initial results, and was determined to maintain progress. I started researching human nutrition and physiology, learning more about the fasting response and the ketogenic process. I spent a week on a low carb diet, similar to the induction phase of Atkins, in order to trigger ketosis and burn that visceral fat!

 

Now, perhaps more so than alternate-day fasting, low carb diets (i.e. less than 15g net carbs per day) are a lifestyle choice - one must plan meals in advance and seek out exotic substitutes for the commonplace carbohydrates which underpin so much of our cuisine today. The result of using egg whites and Splenda in place of batter for cakes and pancakes, for example, is never truly satisfactory, and every purchased or proffered meal must be vetted for carb content. What a pain in the arse! I truly believe that if a lifestyle change is too restrictive one will quickly succumb to the lure of the easy life.

 

So, currently my diet is based on moderation and common sense, with 'days off' factored in to facilitate a social life or unforeseen circumstances. I have a low-calorie, low carb day, followed by a more or less normal day, but with an eye on the carbs, so I'm still running a net deficit. On my low carb days I have a large omelette with cheese and stir-fried vegetables (usually including either broccoli or red cabbage) as my first meal after my morning walk. I find this fills me up for the rest of the day, wherein I just drink green tea, chai and water. If I feel a little hungry at any point I grab a handful of chopped mixed nuts and seeds, which seems to do the job. I'll have a a small meat-and-green-leafy-vegetable meal in the evening and a glass or two of wine. I never eat after 9pm.

 

As well as the (almost daily) walk I do pull ups and push ups, and use an ab-toner belt for the stomach, as my doctor recommended against sit-ups.

 

After 6 weeks I now have a BMI of 24.35 and weigh 70.02 kilos. I can actually see what appear to be muscles in some places!

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ModBod -- Can you give a detailed breakdown of your menus on various days? Like you, I believe in sustainable diets and my logic has followed much the same path as yours.

 

What is your workout plan now?

 

And where are you located? Since I have moved to London, I've found it extremely easy to sustain a high proten, low carb, and gluten/lactose free diet. I just haven't had the time to join a gym yet.

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