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I cannot think of any alterationist I would use. The standard recommendation is to use your "house" tailor. This is a tailor who sees you not as another transaction but who sees you as a regular. Nobody likes altering stuff. Not even when you pay them for it.

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Slimming down bespoke Jap trousers is a veritable science like brain surgery. As jap fine tailoring is probably at level 21 due to their unique French and Kimono heritage. The latter leached into the former and created an alternative style of it's very own conception of how to construct lapels etc. Italian maybe level 18 only IMHO. Saville Row maybe 20. I don't ever want them butchered. Get it wrong and the whole alignment with the pockets, crotch and line will be thrown right out.

 

I need a tailor who can take the in and out seam out and take out the cloth on both ends on both sides and put it back again. Such an operation will probably cost triple what it takes to make pants from scratch, but these are like nuclear weapons to me, I've tried to tailor new ones, but they never seem to be as comfortable as my Osaka tailored pants @ 240 Grammes per meter they don't scratch or ever feel itchy or hot. Thanks anyways.

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Slimming down bespoke Jap trousers is a veritable science like brain surgery. As jap fine tailoring is probably at level 21 due to their unique French and Kimono heritage. The latter leached into the former and created an alternative style of it's very own conception of how to construct lapels etc. Italian maybe level 18 only IMHO. Saville Row maybe 20. I don't ever want them butchered. Get it wrong and the whole alignment with the pockets, crotch and line will be thrown right out.

 

I need a tailor who can take the in and out seam out and take out the cloth on both ends on both sides and put it back again. Such an operation will probably cost triple what it takes to make pants from scratch, but these are like nuclear weapons to me, I've tried to tailor new ones, but they never seem to be as comfortable as my Osaka tailored pants @ 240 Grammes per meter they don't scratch or ever feel itchy or hot. Thanks anyways.

 

If the trousers are comfortable, and baggy so be it. I see nothing wrong if it fits you well. It may not be contemporary but if it is comfortable then wear it with a 'I dont care' attitude. Just say you are channeling the 1950s. 

 

If you want something slim, commission another pair... you may ruin the trousers. 

 

Like what Kotmj said. Most of the better tailors I know do not like altering other people's work. Unless he knows you for a while.


One can never have too many shoes......or cars...or watches...or houses...or...

motoring-malaysia.blogspot.com

and

amalaysianman.blogspot.com/

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I suppose my topic about brown captoe oxfords with casual clothing got swarmed by this sudden tsunami about JM Weston, Mercedes, steel mills, Meermins, and sultans. Anyway thanks riggy for your advice, much appreciated. I like the brown oxfords, but would prefer getting a more casual pair (assuming someone buys it). Don't ask me why I got them in the first place... long story.

 

On another note, I actually have a pair of classic line Meermins. Compared to my Carminas, the suede on the Meermins are a clear step down. On the Carminas there is a brilliant iridescence about the suede... Stroking it reveals a different shade of colour depending on the angle. There is little of this on the Meermins. Plus, the Meermins squeak when I walk. I believe I saw a number of you saying the same thing somewhere in this thread too. Has put me off from buying another pair from Meermin.

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I don't know whether it's me. Or the people here. I don't mean this as a general indictment on the quality of humans in this forum. Only if Michangelo just had clay to work with, he would probably just be a great flower pot artisan. No David. Same goes when it comes to shoes and the art of appreciating them. Branding to me says nothing whatsoever about quality and potential. Again please don't be quick on the draw and shoot me down. As I want to be honest, meaningful and share my experience when it comes to shoes. But I feel a common flaw in this forum and others when it comes to shoes is to be overtly fixated on the brand and so mesmerized by pricing so as to completely disregard the broader potential of what ANY shoe can offer. Firstly when it comes to quality, I have seen impeccable quality from everything ranging from Fortuna that is made in Indo to Meermins. Have also come across downright flog off's 'sell you this on the marque' on Weston's to Kanpekina's that I know was OEMed in the Balkans. So what Riggy said abt Weston's is partly true. My point is not all shoe stables can be expected me consistent on all ranges, MOST specialize. Some are brouging experts, others welt specialist, toe cap shape masters etc etc. But if it was me. I don't really care about the brand or cost. I am not saying Meermins are better than Corthay's. But they can be...Especially if they come in fawn or cafe au lait and after antiquing them, those Meermins can just as well stand proud alongside the pedigree of Weston's and Carmina's. My point is a shoe is really just a blank canvass. Don't expect the shoe manufacturer to supply the shock and awe and finishing touches that's for you to add in, it's never ever going to happen in the age of organizational efficiency - so to me, providing it's a baseline Good year welted and not a gum shoe...it's good to go lah!

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Like I said, if people here have the maturity and self respect to be nice to me. Then perhaps I may consider renovating the first shoe for FOC and after that we can all encase it in bullet proof glass and marvel over it for years to come in the kerbau hall of fame. Don't micro manage me. I am an artist, work with only my own formulated Saphir dyes that's not commercially in a color pantheon. Just tell me what you regularly wear and I will fill in the blanks. But if it's going to be the case of which brand is the best or whether Carmina's look better than Corthay's blah blah, then I think all you chappies are just going around in big and small circles.

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But the Meermins squeak. And no amount of patina can cure that simple fact. 

 

Whilst I adore patina, I also like shoes that do not squeak. 

 

On a personal note, I do not bother if the shoe is GYW, Blake, Norwegian, Stuck on, pegged. 

 

I have or have had them all and even the glued ones, they seem to last years.

 

And as they last for years some more than a decade, the patina on them is a natural patina. 

 

Pictures. In any case there is a need for proof of talent...Michelangelo the artist or the ninja turtle, Evidence to remove doubt is required.

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One can never have too many shoes......or cars...or watches...or houses...or...

motoring-malaysia.blogspot.com

and

amalaysianman.blogspot.com/

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I have a pair of Loake 1881 from the 90's that were originally tan but which has since become an indefinite brown I can offer up as blank canvas.

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Like I said, if people here have the maturity and self respect to be nice to me. Then perhaps I may consider renovating the first shoe for FOC and after that we can all encase it in bullet proof glass and marvel over it for years to come in the kerbau hall of fame. Don't micro manage me. I am an artist, work with only my own formulated Saphir dyes that's not commercially in a color pantheon. Just tell me what you regularly wear and I will fill in the blanks. But if it's going to be the case of which brand is the best or whether Carmina's look better than Corthay's blah blah, then I think all you chappies are just going around in big and small circles.

Are you a shoe doctor? Or a patina specialist?

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Shoes really only squeak for two noticeable reasons - firstly the threading in the between the welt and sole is being stretched. In which case, it's normal. Even the best crafted shoes suffer from this in process of breaking in. Second is more serious and refers to a phenomenon known as blue tanning drumming - that's when the tannery failed to cure the leather properly. Usually the time taken to tan premium leather is precious, as most vats are in high manufacturing demand. So if it squeaks, the leather could only be PARTIALLY cured which is a very big problems for shoes when they are transported from the temperate to equatorial - that's why I.never ever buy my shoes from PLal. Most of their stuff sit in containers for three straight months. Thereafter they are primed to crack. Most of these cracks are not visible to the naked eye, they are microscopic. I recommend mink oil to moisturize the leather.

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Don't talk gibberish. Shoes are not cars like Myvi's, just as your main squeeze isn't a table top. She could be level headed, but that doesn't mean I would ever consider using your girlfren to put my tiger beer on her head and cup of peanuts while I watch TV. Like I said providing it's baselines good year welted, it's good to go! Don't buy into that crap just because you paid more necessarily means you get a higher quality of hide off the back of a cow on a good day - there's a lot of technology that goes into leathering and tannery and in my considered opinion there is no such thing as bad leather or for that matter a bad shoe with the possible exception of gummed shoes quality leather - antiquing can enhance the value of a shoe by at least anything around 500% to 800%. When I was working in London and Paris, I never came across a single customer who ever owned a pair of black shoes. Never! You know why, black shoes have no character whatsoever, it's like an artistic Chernobyl. I worked as an apprentice, but I got to be honest with all of you. I never made it to meister level, as I did it just to pay my tuition bills, but it beats mopping floors in Mcdonalds any day. Nonetheless I was one of the best and when I working in Japan for seven straight years as an engineer. My skills were highly sought after by Japanese shoe stables to add a certain je ne ces qua to their range of products. Evidently those master crafts men there who I might add are better in my opinion than most EU trained shoemakers as they have additional processes such as curing leather before nail-age valued my métier in antiquing, unlike some people here who demonstrate a lack of respect for themselves and those who may have special knowledge in this subject.

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Kotmj. I think it's time to demo to put a gum boot in the gab of some people here. Nothing beats doing...so tell me is it a oxford, derby, brogue or what? Tanned. Fawn? Do you have a pic?

 

Once it's done res ipsa loquitur!

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My point is a shoe is really just a blank canvass.

One can have a Myvi painted in Ferrari Red too.

 

Just be upfront and say you can make shoes LOOK good. Claiming anything more just makes you look silly.

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I make a man look a cut above. That is the function of antiquing, it imparts character, depth and nuance - on the character side it lends, the mystery of charioscuro, quiet sophistication and cultivation of impeccable taste. Don't take an analogy to an illogical end. It's not a Myvi. Just because you insist it is doesn't make it so. Two men. All things considered equal. Both wearing manufactured shoes. The one with patin, wins hands down - as he is able to convey everything I mentioned sans above - you can't just walk into a shop and buy a production shoe or even a bespoke shoe with antiquing, it's an extra service. But definitely not a side dish. As for shoe owners who have no idea what I am talking about. They best settle for spit and polish. What they never know will never rub them the wrong way, that's the redemption of ignorance, it is truly bliss. But to those who know...they know.

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Even the owner of WJ & Co (Wen) told me his Meermins sqeuak. Said he dismantled it and tried all kinds of method but it still squeaked... so it's been put to bed now I think. He suspects the insole or outsole wasn't properly moisturized which could be the reason for it... something along those lines. Maybe it ties in with what Chong said about the curing during the tanning process.

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And that incidentally is the very same reason why the vast majority of shoe collectors in Malaysia and Singapore experience what I can only describe as perpetual grief - because they bomb out 3K on premium and no one seems to notice their pride and joy. You want to know why. It's very simple and everyone who works in the shoe industry at a commercial level knows this truism by heart. Are you ready. Have you got your sarong double tied down? ALL SHOES LOOK THE SAME! All production shoes at least, matters not whether they are Weston's, Church, Loake...they all look the same. They are all Myvi. As they are all manufactured under strict manufacturing criteria of time and motion efficacy to optimize on human and capital resources. So all this talk about this or that is quality and that is crud and this only cuts ice like that takes a swan dive all amounts to masturbation. Only the Japanese seem to be able to reverse this corrosive trend, but mind you, they work in ultra small set ups, like one master and apprentice in a room and maybe produce less than fifty shoes a year, but even so they tend towards specialization. Problem is their production is so micro that even if you want to buy, they can't supply. But mind you what is produce is definitely one of a kind. Ordinary person looks at it and he knows, he's standing before the prophetic and all his previous conceptions of shoes at that very moment is vaporized there and then and replaced by only the awful realization that shoes can be weaponized with the power of beauty and the skill that makes all this possible is antiquing. Shoe making is merely stretching out a blank canvass on crisp pine. Antiquing is the art. Today you learn. Today your brain has grown measurably. Don't believe go to the mirror and measure it now. go!

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The last photo looks good. The rest have either zero effect, except maybe the Rossetti, if it is so. But even then it looks like the technician was munching on a Big Mac when he was airbrushing the highlights. Botch job. The correct method is always apply the patin with a brush like in the last. As for the specs. They look like Loake, they're dead as garden gnomes.

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Dr Chong, I'll put up a pic of my Loake 1881 tomorrow which will represent the "before" pic. I'll drop it off at a place you nominate. Once I receive them back, I'll take "after" pictures. I'll put effort into the pictures. If my Loakes look anything like the last pic riggy posted, you will be inundated with requests.

 

http://www.berluti.com/en/articles/the-art-of-patina#.VyjF6WjmjMI

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