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tumblr_luzqtupitN1r3qt3co1_500.jpg

 

The loafers look much better here than on the website. Before I saw this, I had the impression that his lasts are a bit square-ish, because he never takes any top down pictures. Price is attractive!

 

Edit: Pic is from edetal's tumblr

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@Terror: I feel his current lasts work well for casual styles like the pennies. I tried them on and they look good on the foot. I am not so sure about the last for lace-ups. I believe he has new lasts available for his mtm work, and some of them look very elegant, with a chiselled toe. The leather is sourced from around the region, and it looks to be of decent quality. Full-grain. I think the price is attractive. I would probably pick the Ed Et Al penny over the Cheaneys at P Lal.

 

@Andrew very nice! Almost copped a pair myself :)

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I have a pair of Ed Et Al monkstraps. they look better in real life than the stock photos. Will post some photos as soon as I can.

Fitwise: they sides were pretty narrow, I had to go to my cobbler to stretch it out for me, was much comfortable after stretching.

The shoes are actually made in Vietnam, and the soles could do with a better finishing, some of the edges are still rough. Overall great value for money

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So English 'Goodyear welted' shoes today are not actually Goodyear welted, then? The term surely means that the insole and welt are stitched together? But now if the insole isn't stitched at all, then is it still Goodyear welted?

I'm not an authority on shoes at all, so I'll just tell you how I see this.

 

It's a modified Goodyear welted process. The GY process itself is a cost-saving process that mechanized the handsewing, significantly increasing the output of the shoe producer. The latest iteration with the fabric tape and glue is just a continuation of the process of making shoes more cheaply.

 

The problem with "heritage" products like shoes and suits is that they have all been superseeded by genuinely modern products so there is not much room for innovation that increases the functionality while reducing costs. All that is left is to reduce costs.

 

Some unit cost improvements are found in using faster machines, machines that produce less scrap, and in improvents in the supply chain. Some cost improvements are achived through design changes to the shoe itself, even if accompanied by reduced functionality, so long as they are relatively imperceptible to the typical customer.

 

That's how I see this development.

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The difference water polishing makes...

tumblr_lvpygtMRwk1qc8xtuo1_r1_1280.jpg(the armoury)

 

i remember my time in boarding school, as a member of the military cadets. we were given spike boots as part of the uniform. they were raggedy to say the least, but they still had to have a spit shine regardless.

 

the method we were taught was labor-intensive. first, you would need apply copious amounts of black shoe polish in small circular motions. then, you let it sit for a few hours at least. another layer is applied after, in the same fashion. again, let it sit.

 

after the second layer has been applied, then you will use some water to polish using the same circular motion. after this step, you should get a rather shiny pair of boots.

 

what you do next is light a candle, and drip wax all over the leather part of the boots. this is then followed by heating the spots of wax so that they even out on the surface.

 

if i remember correctly, you apply one more layer of shoe polish after this wax process. this is followed by a round of polishing it off with some water, and finally some buffing.

 

hmmm now i'm not too sure if i got the whole process right. but i definitely remember the use of water and candle wax.

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I have this shoe-problem unique to my leather-soled shoes: they grow mildew (or fungus, I can't tell). I noticed this during the current rainy season. A mink oil barrier does nothing to help. Thoughts?

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FYI, P. Lal has moved to Jln Gasing. Quite a big place very impressive but from what i can i see it's pretty much the same stock.

 

On a side note where can i get the Saphir Renovateur? How much is it locally? Or is it better to buy online?

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Yup...PLAL has moved just down the road from where I work. Been contemplating visiting them, but too scared that I might just walk out with something, or several things.

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Probably caused by humidity. Only solution I can think of is to store them in a dry environment. Cardboard box with a dehumidifier thrown in? Maybe lay them on newspapers too.

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anyone triggering anything? looks like mainly grenson for paul stuart deadstock. usually very good, stuart's choice are made to masterpiece standards.

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I really like their penny loafers. But unfortunately they do not ship internationally. Then again, Singapore isn't that far. Price wise is also good. Anyone using their shoes?

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