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Pebble grained shell? I dunno about that. I read an interview with Tony Girling where he said the only proper use of shell is for a plain toe blucher.

 

(null)

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I've read about gemming a while back and personally after owning goodyear welted, blake rapid, blake stitched, pegged, stuck on a.k.a glued shoes ever since I was in college (I'm 40 now) it does not really matter at all what type of construction if you have about 20 -50 pairs of shoes to rotate. I have all of the above construction (except norvegese) that have been with me for 10 years, and some even longer. So have been inherited from my dad and are still going strong.

 

The problem will only arise if you have only 2 pairs to go around for the next 20 or so years where you will have to fix the heel (or sole every year or other year or so). It is then you will see your shoes coming apart - and most of you who've found this site would by now have at least 4-5 pairs.

 

So just buy decent quality stuff - this could even mean ferrragamos for all I care (I've got a glued penny loafer that is over 5 years old for weekend rotation) and make sure that it looks good (no totally square toed or super snouty) and fits you well.


One can never have too many shoes......or cars...or watches...or houses...or...

motoring-malaysia.blogspot.com

and

amalaysianman.blogspot.com/

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I found a simple guide on how to measure your feet when you want to place an order for shoes online. This might prove useful for those who plan to order from Meermin or Vass.

 

pied1.jpg

 

stopa.jpgbranie_miary.jpg

 

Some tips on how to measure

 

1. Keeping a pencil in vertical position, outline both feet on an A4 size piece if paper. Mark the arch defining profile

dimensions of the foot with with a pencil kept at the 45 degrees angle from the inside of the foot, between the heel and big

toe.

 

2. Measure with the metric measuring tape the perimeter of the following places 9as illustrated in the picture above)

 

A - Toes

B - Instep

C - Arch

D - Through the heel

 

3. Its best to take measurements while standing, in the afternoon or evening. Better yet, ask for help from another person

when tracing the measurements.

 

Note: You will also need to take measurements of the width and length of your foot as illustrated in the first picture above.

This was taken from here

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Edwin, so are you saying Sagara shouldn't be using the term 'Goodyear welted' since their shoes are actually hand-welted?

 

If all their shoes are hand welted with a carved leather rib, I think they should put that on their marketing collateral. Not many companies can claim to hand welt all their shoes. I myself only do hand welting for bespoke commissions. Without many many skilled workers, it is simply not efficient to hand welt every single pair.

 

Vass and Saint Crispins comes to mind.

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Before we leave the topic of stacked heels too far behind, I have an eyewitness account to make. A while back I bought a pair of suede Bally loafers.

 

ballyloafer1.jpg

 

You can see the striations that suggest multiple layers of leather compressed into a heel. Looking at it from this side, you see the creamy pink colour of raw leather, so nice.

ballyloafer2.jpg

 

Clearly, the heel has to be the bomb. Until one day, the heel fell off.

ballyloafer3.jpg

 

You can clearly see that the leather is merely a veneer around a plastic heel.

ballyloafer4.jpg

 

I don't really want to wear stuff like this.

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I can go on forever, but you get the point. Without luminosity, a pair of shoes have no wow factor. Without it, it looks like corrected grain.

 

This is a fundamental aspect many people do not understand.

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I found a simple guide on how to measure your feet when you want to place an order for shoes online. This might prove useful for those who plan to order from Meermin or Vass.

 

Some tips on how to measure

 

1. Keeping a pencil in vertical position, outline both feet on an A4 size piece if paper. Mark the arch defining profile

dimensions of the foot with with a pencil kept at the 45 degrees angle from the inside of the foot, between the heel and big

toe.

 

2. Measure with the metric measuring tape the perimeter of the following places 9as illustrated in the picture above)

 

A - Toes

B - Instep

C - Arch

D - Through the heel

 

3. Its best to take measurements while standing, in the afternoon or evening. Better yet, ask for help from another person

when tracing the measurements.

 

Note: You will also need to take measurements of the width and length of your foot as illustrated in the first picture above.

This was taken from here

 

Monsieur terrorsquad,

How do you translate the cm/inches to a Vass size number?


Bonjour, je m'apelle Pierre Hermé (avec accent aigu é).

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We get what we pay for and it's still better than the junk you get one can get from Ecco which is similarly priced. If they up their price to $250-300 I'm sure the materials used will be even better.

 

Corrected for accuracy, I have never worn a pair of ecco shoes. Plus you sound like you're insinuating something.

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Before we leave the topic of stacked heels too far behind, I have an eyewitness account to make. A while back I bought a pair of suede Bally loafers. ~snip~

 

This is a common technique used to cut costs. Unfortunately they are used in many of the "luxury" brands. I have seen them personally during my time as a cobbler.

 

Leather wrapped plastic heel blocks, to full on wooden blocks, etc etc etc. There are so many ways to trick the unknowing customer. So many customers of mine come in thinking that wooden heel blocks are standard, and are always surprised when I tell them that they are supposed to be hand stacked leather.

 

And then, there's leather heel stacks, and there's "leather heel stacks". The quality of leather used for the stacks makes a big difference as well.

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Ed, I'd like to know your thoughts about the outsole. There appears to be two camps, with one in the small minority.

 

Camp A

Outsoles should be of leather. If possible, use oak-bark tanned leather. If customers complain of premature wear in the tip, put in metal plates. Rubber for the outsole is a sacrilege except in country shoes/boots.

 

Camp B

Leather as material for the outsole is so outmoded lah brother. Leather wears out quickly, doesn't provide enough grip, and if wet shouldn't at all be worn. There is a better material -- rubber. Some types of rubber formulated for use as soles are nice to walk on, provide a lot of grip so you can be James Bond in them, have triple the abrasion resistance of leather, are indifferent to water, and are cheap.

 

This is only about the outsole. I think we all agree that the insole is the whole reason we wear traditionally-made shoes in the first place.

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I think a position on soles would have to be consistent with a position with general issues of sartorial orthodoxy. It's really an ontological issue. Camp B's position would win hands down if pragmatism is the prevailing ideology. But for most people on this forum, I suspect, it isn't.

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I think a position on soles would have to be consistent with a position with general issues of sartorial orthodoxy. It's really an ontological issue. Camp B's position would win hands down if pragmatism is the prevailing ideology. But for most people on this forum, I suspect, it isn't.

 

This, exactly. It's really just because it's what's "right". Because leather has been the material used since the past. Doesn't matter that rubber is newer and probably functionally better, but because the sole has always been constructed from leather, makes it correct and "proper".

 

My shoes are all leather soled, but that's only because they happen to be made that way. I don't mind rubber; just as long as the sole isn't extra thick with superfluous treading. I get that leather is also supposedly "nicer" to look at, but if any SF groupthink moron were to say something along the lines of "nice shoes, but the soles...", I'd tell him to go fuck himself.

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