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kotmj

What did you eat just now?

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Quite surprised to hear this actually! I thought the Xtrans sensors tended to reflect colours as they are, but by your comments they're instead washed out. 

 

These are the guys who are known to have great out of camera shots.

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In the picture below, I am holding my iPad vertically with my left hand while my right hand is holding the camera with which the picture was taken. The iPad is displaying the picture of the bottle taken with the Fujifilm XM-1. To the right is the bottle, itself, in the flesh.

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And in this picture, the iPad is displaying the picture I took earlier with the Canon 70D.

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Fujifilm has a long way to go before approaching Canon. In just about everything, even lenses. But particularly in color science. Sony has similar problems with its colors.

 

I have almost no use for the Fuji because I am constantly (everyday) taking pictures of clothes, of cloth swatches, of cloth-lining combinations for the tumblr, this forum, and for emailing to customers. The Fuji simply cannot render any blue, or red or green as it actually is. It's always some fucked up color the Fuji reproduces. The lenses are double the price of Canon and less well-performing. Take the Fujifilm 27/2.8 pancake. Poor minimum focus distance, poor image quality at close range, loaded with distortion which Fuji corrects in the camera, antiquated focusing drive system but USD449. The Canon EF-S 24/2.8 is USD149 but better in every single dimension. It's not even close.

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Some of the best things in life are also the oldest. This here is a sweet of probably ancient lineage, going far , far back in Indian history. It tastes even better than it looks. I wish I know what's it made of other than lots of sugar and ghee. I bought it from the best Indian restaurant I've ever eaten in -- I make the effort to go there when the slightest opportunity presents itself. Everything in this restaurant is very good.

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This morning, picked up these six loaves of sourdough bread. Had three quarters of a wholewheat loaf just now---it is excellent! The lady who bakes these does it as a side business to her full time corporate job.

 

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Chewy crumb with a flavourful crust. I ordered three wholewheat and three rye. She also has spelt, as well as refined wheat.

 

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Had to kill some time while I waited for the accountant to get back from lunch. Herbal jelly, dong ding tea, and guava. Purple cane restaurant.

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I saw a Bangladeshi chewing on betelnut just now, and asked him where he got it. He brought me to a Bangladeshi grocery shop and got out a refrigerated pack of four. RM1.

 

I chewed on one and it was not good. Like chewing on damp wood. Also, strange taste. I couldn't see why it is popular.

 

Then, later, I chewed on another one.

 

Now, 15 minutes later, I feel like I had overdosed on caffeine or some sort of stimulant. Very awake and jumpy. My hands are jittery.

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Queuing up for keropok lekor in the epicenter of lekor-making, Kg Losong in Kuala Terengganu. I later discovered a road sign pointing the way to a Muzium Keropok Lekor. I hope that museum is privately funded. What a strange use of money.

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Now I've gazed upon the demeanour of slaves  

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Managed to make my first successful sourdough loaf. I had this starter that has never made anything successful before, so I stored in at the back of the fridge 3 years ago. Last friday, in an attempt to clean my fridge, I decided to give this starter another try. It worked!! Crispy crust, chewy, airy, tasty crumb. Process took most of a day, though...fermentation process and all.

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1 hour ago, kotmj said:

Wow, wow. What a success. Was it a no-knead recipe? Wheat flour only, or rye as well?

No knead...just occasional folds here and there.  Jon Favreau in his "the Chef Show" mentioned it as the "tartine no knead method". Unbleached wheat flour with 10% wholemeal added in, as I was not sure if the starter would work, and I wanted to eliminate all possible causes of failure first.

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A couple months ago I bought an oven and wholewheat roller milled flour in order to bake a bread. But I never got around to even unboxing the oven. Also haven't grown the starter. 

If they extend the MCO again I might just do it. 

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8 hours ago, kotmj said:

A couple months ago I bought an oven and wholewheat roller milled flour in order to bake a bread. But I never got around to even unboxing the oven. Also haven't grown the starter. 

If they extend the MCO again I might just do it. 

For bread, especially sourdough, just start growing the culture. Feed it once a day, and it should mature in a week. It's like a pet.

What oven did you get? And what brand of flour?

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It's a Khind oven. I bought one just large enough to accomodate a Le Creuset pot. Some sort of generic wholemeal bread flour. 

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I was messaging with a friend about the shocking amounts of oil used in preparing food. Sambal, as most of us know it, is 90% cooking oil with bits of solids floating in and permeated by it. No other species of primate consumes oil like homo sapiens. Even when we eat vegetables, each surface of the vegetable is coated in oil. The vegetable sits in a puddle of oil. If you believe we are evolutionarily close to monkeys, you should recognise that our food is extremely atypical to that of primates. Now, of course, it is the mastery of fire, and hence cooked foods, that made humans human. Otherwise, such an energy-intensive brain would not be possible. But the oil thing is a new development that came about only through the industrialisation of farming. 

This oil is the cause of insulin resistance. 

This reminded me of a very curious sambal I had at a Peranakan restaurant. It was completely oil-free. It tasted fresh, and fruity. I googled to see if the Peranakans have a different take on the sambal, and indeed, discovered their sambal belacan. 

It is different from other sambals in two fundamental ways. First, it is more like a salsa in that it isn't cooked. Second, it contains no oil.

You blend fresh chillies, with toasted belacan. Squeeze in some lime or calamansi. That's it. 

The Peranakans see this as a refreshing salsa. You should be able to eat this by itself. Therefore, do not make it too spicy by adding cili padi to it. Also, the belacan is used sparingly; to give it some salinity and umami, but no more. The goal is a fruity salsa, not a musty, salty one. 

I just made a batch and I love it. 

 

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If I am in the mood, I may make a more complex one. I could accentuate the fruitiness by adding kaffir lime leaves, lemon zest, or even whole kumquat. For more flavours, I could add ginger and turmeric. Some sugar would really bring it into the fruity realm. 

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The oily sambal u mention is known as a sambal tumis, where lotsa onions and stuff are cooked (deep fried) in oil. The latter sambal, of the sambal belacan type is eaten usually with fresh ulam in Malay-style meals. Similar, uncooked sambals, such as sambal tempoyak and sambal cencaluk are also uncooked and not at all oily.

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