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kotmj

What did you eat just now?

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Thats an interesting read kotmj. Didnt realise the art of noodle making was so technical.

Anyway how is that pan mee (when made by the old man) compared to Kin Kin, off Jalan TAR?

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That's sad. The greying and ultimate retirement of hawkers (street food artisans, if you like) in urban Malaysia seems to be inexorable. They are reluctant to teach the art to the migrant workers they use for cheap labour and there are no Malaysian apprentices to take it up. The end result is that whatever culinary art they developed over the decades will go with them.

 

I observe somewhat optimistically that some migrants (perhaps they are naturalised Malaysians now?) are setting up stalls of their own, selling a mix of adapted Malaysian cuisine and food from their own culture. These people are energetic, savvy and entrepreneurial. More importantly, they are also young. They also possess the competitive advantage of cultural fluency in dealing with the migrant labour force.

 

Maybe it will be up to a new wave of Malaysians to keep local street food alive.

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I've never tried Kin Kin; the thing is pan mee is not my breakfast of choice on weekends etc. (dim sum is) so I do not try all that many pan mees.

 

I think the quality of hawker food has really gone downhill in KL, especially in some places like Damansara. When I used to live near Bentong the food was incredible.

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I totally get the 'bite' factor. There's this udon shop in Jaya One, PJ, which sells bowls of meaty, bitey udon with broth and meat of your choice at RM10 a bowl. Or thereabouts. My favourite if the 'dry niku' udon, which is udon served with minimal kuah (okay...its more damp than dry), a soft egg and strips of fatty beef. The makings for a good lunch. Oh...BTW, it's called Marufuku.

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I have tasted quite a number of Korean BBQ including those in Ampang. There is one in Taipan USJ, located along the Public Bank row. So far, I like their Bul Go Gi, and other dishes are good too. Only drawback is their variety of condiments/side dishes are not as great as those in KL. But food quality wise, Taipan is better. And the environment is better too.

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This is quite an old institution in Bukit Damansara. I'm sure some of you would have been there. But when I think pork ribs, I think of Checkers. Advisable to bring your own red wine there though. For some reason, they chill their house red wine. This review recommends the "Lord of the Ribs" dish. But trust me, "Porky's Ribs" is where its at. The wasabi/onion/barbeque sauce dipping sauce is quite an experience. The shrimp scampi is also a personal favourite. Home baked french rolls to dip in the sauce. Bring your friends and an empty stomach boys.

 

http://www.3-meals.com/2008/10/11/checkers-at-bukit-damansara/

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Pardon my ignorance, but...what's that? I'm torn between deciding its either some kind of shellfish or a 'kueh' made to look as such.

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The Australians eat them raw or they grill them in their shells or something. The Chinese typically buy them in dry form -- like dried oysters. Unlike oysters, dehydrating abalone causes changes in protein structure that makes them incredibly tough (like tyre) even after reconstitution. To be of edible consistency they then need to be braised for like 48 hours or something as inefficient as that.

 

The ones you see above are canned, and are quite soft and ready to eat. You can throw then into these Cantonese soups or you can braise them with dried scallops and shitake mushrooms like below. Braised abalone is a pretty standard dish for CNY.

 

braisedabalone.jpg

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I've been told that the best sunday roast is albion on changkat

 

But alas...they are far from being 'Kosher' (I just checked the online menu..demm!). Someone please try both and tell me what I'm missing (a description of food, when done well, is better than a photo). On a more 'Kosher' note, the cigar lounge at Mutiara Hotel serves roast beef, turkey and lamb for lunch on working days. Its a buffet, so the quality is slightly less than Harrods (for the roast beef), but hey, you can really stuff yourselves. The crumbles and puddings for dessert are the best I've tasted. Oh, and u can only sit on leather armchairs and eat of coffee tables. Then there are the cigars....

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But alas...they are far from being 'Kosher' (I just checked the online menu..demm!). Someone please try both and tell me what I'm missing (a description of food, when done well, is better than a photo). On a more 'Kosher' note, the cigar lounge at Mutiara Hotel serves roast beef, turkey and lamb for lunch on working days. Its a buffet, so the quality is slightly less than Harrods (for the roast beef), but hey, you can really stuff yourselves. The crumbles and puddings for dessert are the best I've tasted. Oh, and u can only sit on leather armchairs and eat of coffee tables. Then there are the cigars....

True carbman, they are not kosher. For a more kosher choice try Acme bar & coffee sunday brunch at Troika, heard good stuff about it. Havent had the chance to try the Sunday brunch but went for drinks and snacks there. Quite good, a tad expensive.

I stay away from hotel buffet, my family used to go for hotel sunday buffet so often i got sick of it. And we dont have the patience for ala carte, so i've got this prejudice in my head about hotel buffet. And i do find KL hotels is all about quantity and not quality much different from Singapore or other places. Just look at our buka puasa buffets advertising 180 dishes served, you'd be lucky if 10 dishes tasted good.

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I avoid the pasar ramadhan and hotel buffets during fasting month. I mean, what's the point? You'll be full by the 2nd glass of water. Not to mention those pasar ramadhan hawkers that probably spend the remaining 11 months doing stuff unrelated to cooking: I've had to many bad experiences to keep track of.

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Hahahahaha. Thats so true. My theory was just because friends & family say they cook good, they think they can do it on a commercial basis. And we are getting conned because everything looks good because we're too damn hungry.

 

On the cigar (forgot to mention it on my previous message), try not to buy it from the hotel they are rip off. The only hotel retail i would consider buying would be Havana Club at Concorde. They have one of the better stocks and they do keep it in the right environment.

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