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What did you eat just now?


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#41 kotmj

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 10:40 PM

Over the past few weeks


Very diverse diet. Don't you ever eat at home?

#42 gshen

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 11:35 AM

Nonya laksa
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Chendol!
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Peranakan feast
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Thanks for the Umbai rec.. seriously good seafood but unfortunately the pictures turned out shite. We had ikan bakar (plain/grilled), tamarind prawns, calamari, kangkong, otah-otah for RM70. Nuts!!

#43 joonian

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 12:10 AM

@kotmj i have observed that most singaporeans eat exclusively outside their homes.

#44 geno

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 01:59 AM


Very diverse diet. Don't you ever eat at home?


rarely..

#45 geno

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 02:02 AM

more over the past 2 weeks

pontian wanton mee

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qiu lian ban mian

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mushroom chicken chop w/ crunchy potato salid (THIS IS REALLY GOOD)

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carbonara at some french place - just nice, and not too creamy, salivating right now posting this up

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duck confit w/ potato gratin

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taiwan beef instant noodles with REAL australian beef

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#46 kotmj

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 11:36 PM

Anybody knows where I can get duck confit in KL?

#47 carbman

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 11:48 AM

Anybody knows where I can get duck confit in KL?



I've had it twice, once at "delicious", Bangsar Shopping Centre (boleh lah), and another at Frangipani (awesome). I liked it very much at Frangipani. You won't look out of place suited-up.

The dish was crispy on the outside, juicy on the inside and was served on a bed of potatoes. Comfort food.

#48 kotmj

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 04:03 PM

Thanks for the tip. You are obviously a gastronomic big timer. I'll take pics of the Frangipani duck.

#49 carbman

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 11:47 PM

I am saddened by "Asam Pedas Commando". Not by its taste or service. But by its lack of being able to open on TWO random, seperate nights. Aiseh.....the Commando must be getting old. Getting there was not easy, either. Alas, I'll probably give it ONE more try.

#50 kotmj

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 03:09 PM

I have a few places to go for breakfast every weekday, and one of them is a pan mee stall that makes the best pan mee I’ve managed to find anywhere. I am writing this after coming back from the stall very disappointed.

I don’t know what happened to the old man. His daughter-in-law or something was manning the stall, and she had a big lump of dough in a basin of water. I have no idea what that dough is doing in water. I know something about noodle making from having observed it and read about it. (The Japanese in particular are crazy about noodles and their recipe books have the most elaborate techniques for preparing the dough.) Hydrating a lump of dough by immersing it is completely new to me.

The bowl of noodles eventually came, and I was charged 50 sen more for it than usual.

One must always understand the fundamental challenge of whatever it is one is doing. You need to have a clear grasp of what the first order factors are before you muck around with the higher order factors. With the first order factors, it is always a goddamned war. You cannot deliver enough on them. Sometimes, the competition on the first order factors becomes so intense that people have to be creative and start putting all sorts of strange things into their products to gain a competitive advantage. This is the reason for the Reinheitsgebot in Germany that outlaws the use of anything but malt, hops, yeast and water in German-brewed beers. That way, everyone has to compete on technique alone.

In noodle making, there are two first order factors. One is the bite of the noodles. The second is the umami hit of the soup.

It turns out that dough does not have much bite by itself. To give good noodles their moderately elastic consistency requires the gluten in the dough to bind to each other, much like in breadmaking. The dough must be knead and rested in a certain way to have bite. For the Japanese, the dough takes 24 hours to make. All for the consistency.

The old man always had a good bite going in his noodles. This morning’s noodles however had absolutely none of it. That’s one first order factor gone.

Umami is a taste. If you boil soup with only a little meat, you don’t get much umami. If you use a lot of meat, you get lots of umami. I think the umami taste comes from the hydrolyzed protein in the soup.

The old man makes a soup with an umami taste like none other. It’s not the synthetic umami of monosodium glutamate either. It’s an intense ikan bilis umami. A complex and intense umami. Like none other. The soup probably uses ikan bilis granules from Maggi bought in bulk or something, and is probably not too good for you, but damn I always look forward to the umami hit I get.

This morning’s soup was bland, with a bit of synthetic umami with no discernible ikan bilis flavour. The second first order factor non-existent.

I took a few bites and left most of that mediocrity in the bowl.

#51 cocopops

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 06:34 PM

Thats an interesting read kotmj. Didnt realise the art of noodle making was so technical.
Anyway how is that pan mee (when made by the old man) compared to Kin Kin, off Jalan TAR?

#52 joonian

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 06:34 PM

That's sad. The greying and ultimate retirement of hawkers (street food artisans, if you like) in urban Malaysia seems to be inexorable. They are reluctant to teach the art to the migrant workers they use for cheap labour and there are no Malaysian apprentices to take it up. The end result is that whatever culinary art they developed over the decades will go with them.

I observe somewhat optimistically that some migrants (perhaps they are naturalised Malaysians now?) are setting up stalls of their own, selling a mix of adapted Malaysian cuisine and food from their own culture. These people are energetic, savvy and entrepreneurial. More importantly, they are also young. They also possess the competitive advantage of cultural fluency in dealing with the migrant labour force.

Maybe it will be up to a new wave of Malaysians to keep local street food alive.

#53 kotmj

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:53 PM

I've never tried Kin Kin; the thing is pan mee is not my breakfast of choice on weekends etc. (dim sum is) so I do not try all that many pan mees.

I think the quality of hawker food has really gone downhill in KL, especially in some places like Damansara. When I used to live near Bentong the food was incredible.

#54 carbman

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 12:18 AM

I totally get the 'bite' factor. There's this udon shop in Jaya One, PJ, which sells bowls of meaty, bitey udon with broth and meat of your choice at RM10 a bowl. Or thereabouts. My favourite if the 'dry niku' udon, which is udon served with minimal kuah (okay...its more damp than dry), a soft egg and strips of fatty beef. The makings for a good lunch. Oh...BTW, it's called Marufuku.

#55 joonian

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 01:16 AM

Carbman, I love the cold udon with poached egg at Marufuku. Affordable, too.

#56 shanecross

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 01:28 AM

Had this for dinner today.

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#57 kotmj

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 12:13 AM

I've had Korean BBQ only once and find I need more opportunity to adapt to the taste.

#58 shanecross

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:22 AM

I have tasted quite a number of Korean BBQ including those in Ampang. There is one in Taipan USJ, located along the Public Bank row. So far, I like their Bul Go Gi, and other dishes are good too. Only drawback is their variety of condiments/side dishes are not as great as those in KL. But food quality wise, Taipan is better. And the environment is better too.

#59 kotmj

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 11:21 PM

Had our "sau kung chau" (CNY dinner with colleagues) just now. Really good food.

#60 "6"

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 07:49 PM

This is quite an old institution in Bukit Damansara. I'm sure some of you would have been there. But when I think pork ribs, I think of Checkers. Advisable to bring your own red wine there though. For some reason, they chill their house red wine. This review recommends the "Lord of the Ribs" dish. But trust me, "Porky's Ribs" is where its at. The wasabi/onion/barbeque sauce dipping sauce is quite an experience. The shrimp scampi is also a personal favourite. Home baked french rolls to dip in the sauce. Bring your friends and an empty stomach boys.

http://www.3-meals.c...ukit-damansara/




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