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The Denim (contrast) Thread

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I would've painted it on a transparency sheet and superimposed it to find the best placement.

What do the lines represent? hills? seagulls?

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Sold 2 jeans to a single customer today. This is also the first time we have a customer who made an appointment specifically for jeans. The previous jeans we sold were to customers who had suit orders, and the jeans were just add-ons. 

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23 hours ago, carbman said:

I would've painted it on a transparency sheet and superimposed it to find the best placement.

What do the lines represent? hills? seagulls?

Grass, believe it or not. 

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I am always surprised at how much I am paying the guy in Japan to sell me copper buttons and rivets. I pay hundreds for a quantity of these doo dads that can fit in the palm of my hand. So, I approached YKK about buying some at wholesale quantity. After much back and forth, they wrote:

Hi Jeremy,

Thanks for your advice, please see our quotation as below.
For Tack Button, we don't have same logo as your picture so we would like to offer Non-logo item.

These items will be produced in YKK Japan and lead time is around 4-6 weeks.
May I know if you have any project?

Thank you!

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So now I know why he charges so much: these things are not catalog items. You have to commission YKK to make them for you. YKK then makes them in their Japanese factory. 

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Posted this to IG yesterday, in case you haven't noticed:

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A bespoke selvedge jeans made to the customer's individual pattern. A stout 18 oz. Zimbabwe cotton woven on vintage shuttle looms by Kuroki in Japan. Solid copper rivets, high tenacity filament threads, and a waistband reinforced to never stretch.

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My beloved Singer 299 being serviced in the apartment of the sewing machine technician. It produces what is known as an eyelet buttonhole, the sort you find on jeans. 

I've not used it in a long time, during which I also moved house, which made it necessary to dismantle the machine into several blocks for the purpose of transporting it. It became very rusty in the meantime. I sent it to the technician to put it back into working order. 

This is an extraordinarily complex machine that only very few technicians can service. The guy working on this has spent his entire career as a sewing machine technician in Karachi, Pakistan, specialising in Duerkopp-Adler eyelet buttonhole machines. He is in Malaysia as a refugee. He is in very high demand in KL. He services all my machines. 

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Pakistani working on my Singer 299U. By this stage, he has spent 2 days on the machine, refurbishing the drive gearbox under the table and in modifying it to be driven by a servo motor. The machine runs exceptionally quietly now. Previously, it was the most incredible rattletrap I have encountered. 

There are still some problems, which he is still diagnosing. 

He spent 10 years as the equipment maintenance head of a certain Bonanza Garments of Karachi, a vertically integrated garment manufacturer and retailer which had during his time there about 1000 machines. He then left to become an independent repairman. 

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Once it works, it will produce the plumpest and nicest buttonholes. I see renowned jeans makers setting their machines to make poor buttonholes because they do not understand how buttonholes are supposed to look like. 

These machines were designed to mimic hand sewn buttonholes. The sort we make by hand everyday on our jackets. But, the machines require the user to adjust certain parameters and to use certain kinds of threads (there are 3 threads which go into a buttonhole) to produce the optimal buttonhole. 

Almost none of the renowned jean makers know what an optimal buttonhole looks like. 

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Next pair of jeans will be in a khaki denim. The same denim I used for a bush jacket. 

This khaki denim has a reputation amongst my staff as a needle breaker. It resists puncturing, and in making the bush jacket we broke 5 needles. 

But! I have a new machine in the shop that has a walking foot and it sews through very tough and thick fabrics without problems. 

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I have 12 yards of this on order. Its a 7 oz. chambray by Kurabo. 46" width selvedge. This is a real work wear chambray by a major Japanese denim weaver. Not a gentrified chambray by some Italian mill that turns out to contain polyester. Should make for a delicious shirt. 

I have also stopped posting jeans pictures on JT's Instagram. Instead, I post them to savajeans. 

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