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kotmj

Interiors

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I like that crane-like thing (Nat Geo in Singapore has smth similar). I was searching for smth similar before I decided on a more classic style. I still like the industrial/minimalist look, but for design coherence, I've dropped the idea.

 

http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/2/files/2011/05/Freitag-Berlin-store-1.jpg

 

I once toyed with the idea of having each room decorated differently -- I think I'll just port all the industrial and modern stuff to the future kid's/or guest room. The rest of the home will just be classic.

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Boys: If you can see the pictures of the Freitag basement, check it out. The interplay of stairs, storage and display is really cool.

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Calling BDC calling BDC please continue the discussion over here.

 

I started cooking because it was unhealthy for my son to eat outside food, and simple home cooked food beats any expensive restaurant hands down, because it is catered to your own taste. My simple dishes cooked with gourmet ingredients beat any restaurants hands down. Cooking must be done with passion and not as a chore.

 

Regarding knives I am a huge fan of KAI and since they are readily available here. I will be buying a Fujioh hood and Rinai inner flame hob, which I find the most suitable for Asian cooking styles. Sealed pans like the Korean Happy-Call is extremely popular with housewives here as it really can save time cooking the entire meal in one go. I use that when I don't want my laundry to smell of steak or salmon.

 

My wife is forcing me to buy a Cleanlady stainless steel kitchen but I rather do carpentry and use good moving parts from Hettich or Blum. This way I can customise the look as the Japanese designs are too sterile for my taste. I foresee major disagreements over furnishing choices. Thus I need to stock up more Scotch to regain my sanity.

 

My idea was to put up a display cabinet to showcase my drinking glassware and alcoholism. But my wife finds it a disgrace she have an alcoholic spouse so that didn't turn up too well. Having a young kid at home who is like a bull in a china shop means I have to find a cheap source of disposable stoneware instead of porcelain. Or I could go follow the Koreans and use steel utensils which are indestructible.

 

Moral of the story: Don't get married, don't have kids.

 

Global knives are great, or so I heard. I almost bought one, but went with hand forged.

 

Getting kitchen stuff used to be a hobby, but I'm so busy nowadays I no longer have a hobby. I got myself a cast iron gas stove, the big ones that chaw kway teow hawkers use. The energy output is like that of a space shuttle at takeoff.

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I've read about Kinmen a long while back. The best Chinese Chef's knives are actually made in Malaysia, surprisingly. Brand 55, used by all fine chicken rice shops. I have bought a few over the years. Better made than the celebrated Chan Chee Kee of HK.

 

Here's my hand forged gyuto

macro.jpg

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The santoku knife is useful for general kitchen work. This one knife is all you need in a minimalist kitchen. Price range for a good santoku knife ranges from $30 to $100 and up.

 

Due to space constraint I would just buy a baby belling instead of a full size mounted oven. No point buying a Miele when baking is done once in a blue moon.

 

Kitchen real estate is a premium in the new public housing projects, I might just do a galley design.

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That is a beauty. The only blade smith I know is Jason Brous from the US but he makes knives for slicing people rather than food. His crafts are all works of art.

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Just asking is it feasible to have a classical interior within small spaces or should I just keep in simple with modern minimalist.

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What all the photos you posted have in common. 1 central focal point and the room is arrange in near symmetry around the pivot. For example the fireplace and painting, the regal desk, the opening in the bookshelves. And the ceiling is very tall, suitable for hanging chandeliers and game trophies etc. When you have the luxury of space, the possibilities are only limited by your creativity.

 

Does your missus share your love for classical interiors?

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That's very sharp of you Petia. I read a home decor book on English decor arrangements and there is usually a central focal point in an Englush home, and it's typically the fireplace or a mantelpiece.

 

In Asia, it's typically the television. I do not intend to have a television because I don't watch tv at all.

 

You're also right about the high ceiling. At my parents, and my grandparents' homes, the ceilings are very high and both of them have chandeliers suspended. I think condos and hdbs do not have Tt luxury. Correct? Can you hang a chandelier on the ceiling of your home?

 

The missus likes classic stuff, yes. Influenced by me no doubt. She doesn't like the exotic stuff like animal trophies etc because she thinks it's cruel and that it looks gory.

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This is my apartment's design to drawn to scale using Google Sketchup, not pretty but it works and its free. You can see the design have evolved to version 11 due to new ideas subject to wife approval.

 

mydecor_zpsbf20aeb8.jpg

 

Chandeliers and other big lighting hung from the ceiling will only make the small space look even smaller. Small tracked lights, alcove lighting and ceiling lamps are more popular in apartments. How to "paint" rooms with light is another topic worth discussing.

 

For the really traditional warm look, ie nothing beat the environmentally unfriendly power guzzling incandescent lamps. Florescent tubes are able to produce warmer colors tones too but still the simple old light bulb looks better with the more classical lamps.

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Not sure if you like classical Asian furniture. Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Indian, South East Asian furnishings all are charming in their own right.

 

Currently I am sleeping on futons as my wife threw out the old bed. I don't wish to buy a new bed and mattress and worry about moving them into the new place a year later. At first I didn't get used to it but after a while, I realised why the Japanese and Koreans like to sleep on the floor rather on beds. My back and neck problem just went away and I don't feel sore after sitting the entire day at the office anymore.

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This is my apartment's design to drawn to scale using Google Sketchup, not pretty but it works and its free. You can see the design have evolved to version 11 due to new ideas subject to wife approval.

 

mydecor_zpsbf20aeb8.jpg

 

Chandeliers and other big lighting hung from the ceiling will only make the small space look even smaller. Small tracked lights, alcove lighting and ceiling lamps are more popular in apartments. How to "paint" rooms with light is another topic worth discussing.

 

For the really traditional warm look, ie nothing beat the environmentally unfriendly power guzzling incandescent lamps. Florescent tubes are able to produce warmer colors tones too but still the simple old light bulb looks better with the more classical lamps.

 

Ermm, it reminds me of those point-and-click escape from a room computer game.

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Pet, kind of looks like my house but a bit more rectangular. I need to look for a bigger appartment but the prices nowadays are ridiculous.

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Zinzan, which side of the Causeway are you located at?

 

Received this in the mail today:

 

William & Mary (1690) Chest on Stand. Very rare and costly English Burr Walnut, the epitome of 17th Century style. Later versions would have been made of the more abundant and less costly Mahogany.

 

Needless to say, I didn't even bother to reply.

 

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001tzOdtUSGuREv9tVafqKyXhXnpm-Ej2Ra3VUR99pVMbwedho8OuOmesZqBybt5_lqcbIVb2xlHk_x9g7XiYPWRVhIayvvJRc2ZGfSf7qsjf3jH2PspKYZ03a9TEoIolGpUhQ5XX4MKPbvr7cqz7VL-ShgFwtHRE0qvmB644caLERhmcEWUjTXcYXxSY78GUWe4-ALy56lzhA=

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