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joonian

Garment maintenance

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On 3/26/2017 at 10:33 AM, NoName said:

I have the Silverstar. It cuts down ironing time significantly compared to the household irons thanks to the steam and weight. But u have to get used to the water hose from the water tank to the iron, a nuisance since movement becomes limited. 

Finally got the Silverstar about a month back. Excellent results pressing pants and putting in a crease, but I am not getting good results ironing shirts.

I got frustrated and switched back to my Tefal steam iron last night, and I just realised how much hotter the Silverstar is, even with the Tefal set to max. So I'm thinking I was simply using a too high heat on the Silverstar, to the point that the fabric of the shirt doesn't cool enough as I move the shirt around, and 'forgets' the ironing it has received.

So what setting do you use on the Silverstar for shirts? I was using 4. Or do you also have a vacuum board that you use with it?

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My sperate resevoir steam iron just has this one "auto" setting. Either on/off.

Do you find some cloth type harder to iron out the wrinkles on the shirt?

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On 2/28/2018 at 11:59 AM, niakulah said:

Finally got the Silverstar about a month back. Excellent results pressing pants and putting in a crease, but I am not getting good results ironing shirts.

I got frustrated and switched back to my Tefal steam iron last night, and I just realised how much hotter the Silverstar is, even with the Tefal set to max. So I'm thinking I was simply using a too high heat on the Silverstar, to the point that the fabric of the shirt doesn't cool enough as I move the shirt around, and 'forgets' the ironing it has received.

So what setting do you use on the Silverstar for shirts? I was using 4. Or do you also have a vacuum board that you use with it?

Highest temperature + just continuously press on the steam button as I iron the shirt. No idea what's a vacuum board, using a cheap metal based ironing board from Ikea.  

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1 hour ago, NoName said:

Highest temperature + just continuously press on the steam button as I iron the shirt. No idea what's a vacuum board, using a cheap metal based ironing board from Ikea.  

Ok. And you don't need to wait for the section to cool down before you move to the next section?

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7 hours ago, NoName said:

Highest temperature + just continuously press on the steam button as I iron the shirt. No idea what's a vacuum board, using a cheap metal based ironing board from Ikea.  

Just tried this, didn't work for me. Here is my JT shirt immediately after ironing.0_0_0_20180301_232709.thumb.jpg.bfaab4c4655ed34052344210526bc7ce.jpgme

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14 hours ago, kotmj said:

I use a spray bottle/mister.

Yes I did before too. I get best results with a lot of water and my Tefal on max temp.

 

I still think my Silver Star is too hot. I might try it on minimum next week.

 

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Used Muji shoes trees for a couple of years now. Sanded it recently and it's good as new again. Smells good now too.

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Over the years I’ve gathered quite a few pairs of shell cordovan shoes. I’ve always used Saphir’s Renovateur and a good hard polishing to maintain them, but they dont really require much attention to look presentable. 

Whilst this protocol was good, but the colour of my shells began to look slightly faded and tired. Recently I noticed a few products designed specifically for cordovan leather, so I decided to indulge. I bought three products:

1. Cordovan cleaner (made with no solvents, to maintain the unique pore structure of cordovan, which solvents apparently screw up). This is by Famaco, a french company which is sold in iSetan and Parkson. 

2. Cordovan cream polish by Saphir, with crazy high concentration of pigments to restore colour. Again, less solvents. 

3. Mirror gloss by Saphir. No solvents like normal Saphir pate du luxe. 

The star of the show is the Famaco. 90% of the results after just one thin application, brush, and buff with cloth. Leather felt nourished too, so probably has mink oil or something in it. 

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Below: the results after just the Famaco. 

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The result after the cordovan cream and light layer of mirror gloss. The cream did restore the richness and colour of faded / tired spot, but doesnt really come up in photos. 

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Nope! The internet have reported good results when used on cordovan, but I nvr had luck sourcing it. You got use before? 

My cordovan shoes are woefully neglected. Only Saphir renovateur and brush polishing. 

The addition of Saphir cream cordovan polish has restored alot of the leather’s magic. 

At rm30 delivered to my doorstep, the Famaco is pretty good in terms of value. 

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Yups used once on a 3yr old Alden shells, covered up scratches.

Bought on Amazon shipped to relative house in US and flown back to me when they came and visit. 

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On 11/26/2019 at 11:39 PM, kotmj said:

My cordovan shoes are dying. I just couldn't be bothered to order stuff online for them. I hate ordering stuff. 

Found an extra Famaco cordovan cream for you. Pass to you when I see you. 

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I've always wanted to write a comprehensive article about caring for suits. This morning, I thought I'd start by writing about moths. 

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The biggest threat to finely tailored suits is the common moth, also known as the clothes moth, Tineola bisselliella. Their destructive power has to do with their stealth and their efficiency. Having a length of only 6-7mm and a rather pale straw colour, the moth isn't very noticeable. Moreover, unlike the mosquito or the fly which seeks you out and buzzes around you, the common moth has no interest in humans and avoids us. Instead, it has a sense of smell keenly tuned to detect moths of the opposite sex, and natural fibers, in particular wool. But the moth doesn't eat the wool. In fact, the moth has no functioning mouth with which to feed. Female moths lay eggs in clusters of up to 200 eggs on an edible substrate---the wool. A few days later, these hatch into tiny larvae, which immediately begin feeding. The moth larva, though tiny, has a mouth that can cut through even tough synthetic fibers to get to the natural fibers on which it feeds. They have the ability to digest the keratin protein in wool and silk and actively seek these out.

As it feeds on the wool the way a silk caterpillar feeds on mulberry leaves, the moth larva leaves behind holes in the cloth. 

The warmer and more humid the conditions, the faster the larva matures to the next stage---the pupal stage, where it spins a cocoon and eventually emerges as an adult moth. Under ideal conditions, the larva takes a month to reach pupal stage. The adult moth itself does not feed, having acquired all the nutrition it needs in the larval stage. It's only goal is reproduction. It has a lifespan of several weeks, dying a few days after mating. 

We can disrupt the life cycle of moths in several ways. The moth is susceptible to aerosol sprays, and can be killed this way just like mosquitoes. Moths are not particularly mobile; they scuttle about on the floor more than they fly. Look out for them at the bottom of your closet. This is the best way to keep moths at bay, because it is when they are most vulnerable. You can build a closet that has a mosquito netting behind every aperture, effectively stopping the moths from reaching your clothes. Periodically exterminating moths with mosquito spray will effectively break their life cycle. 

You may also kill moths by spraying your room with an insecticide. A widely used insecticide for moths is transfluthrin. Fumakilla's Vape One Push V is marketed for use against mosquitoes, but with 24% transfluthrin it is just as lethal for moths. It has the advantage of being widely available. A single spray directed at the ceiling will exterminate all flying insects within the room and repel new ones from entering the room for 12 hours. 

Dry cleaning will both kill and remove the eggs and the larvae from your clothes. If the garment is too fresh and clean to deserve a dry cleaning, a press with a warm iron will also kill the larvae by denaturing the proteins in it. In other words, you cook them with the iron. Protein denatures at temperatures above 41 degrees Celcius. However, due to the temperature gradient, your iron would need to be substantially warmer than this. The "wool" setting on your iron is approximately 160 degrees Celcius, and is certainly hot enough to kill them. 

So much for killing them. You may also repel them---discourage them from regarding your suit as an eat-all buffet. The age old solution was moth balls, if only its effective ingredient napththalene weren't toxic to humans and banned in the EU since 2008. It has another unfortunate side effect---its typical odour transfers to clothes, making you smell like a mothball when you wear them. Both of these disadvantages can be sidestepped with a single measure: use it very judiciously. Put just a very small quantity of them in your closet---two or three balls. That's enough to repel moths without having the other side effects.

There are also modern moth killers/repellents with the active ingredient transfluthrin, mentioned earlier in this article, which you keep in the closet. Transfluthrin is odourless and safe when used according to instructions. It works like most insecticides do, being a nerve poison to insects but mostly harmless to mammals. Daiso sells them. But they have a huge disadvantage: you don't know when they're depleted because they do not announce themselves through their odour. For me, this makes naphthalene superior to transfluthrin as a repellent.

Moths are everywhere. I've had suits brought back by customers from Puchong to London with moth holes. Keeping a vigilant eye out for small, winged creatures around your closet, keeping two or three moth balls in your closet, and the occasional dry-cleaning---or in lieu a press with a warm iron---will eliminate this problem. 

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There are five areas in a suit that are known to be susceptible to wear through friction. The area where people notice wear first is on the trousers, between the thighs. When these people walk, their thighs rub against each other. It affects only some people, either those with an elevated body mass index, or athletes with highly developed thighs. In my practice, maybe one in five people is affected by this. The only real solution is to attach a sacrificial patch of cloth to the affected area. When this patch of either the same or similar cloth is worn, it is replaced with a new patch. No other solution actually works. 

Compared to the above, all other areas of friction lead to much milder wear. Again, in people with a high body mass index and in some athletes, there is wear to the jacket directly under the armpits. When these people move their arms as when walking, their arms rub against the sides of their bodies. 

There is wear to the seat of the trousers, especially for those who have office chairs with a rough-textured seat. This highly-textured seat upholstering is there to grip your bottom to prevent you sliding forward in your chair, but has the unfortunate side effect of scouring away the seat of your trousers.

Supposedly, another area of wear is at the very bottom of the trousers, where the hem rubs against the shoe as you walk. However, in my nine years of practice and in owning and inspecting many vintage garments, no tailored trousers has been affected by this.

Similarly, even in very worn jackets, I've observed no wear whatsoever in the elbow area of the sleeves such that an elbow patch would be justified. 

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