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joonian

Garment maintenance

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5 a sec ruined some shirts of mine a few years back.

 

i sent some brand new shirts for dry cleaning and they came back with yellow stains that must have been caused by dirty water.

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Hey guys, where do you get your jacket pressed? i just realized that the back of my jacket, particularly the lower part is all creased thanks to that all day driving with a jacket. Besides Jeeves..i think they charge RM26 per jacket..i wonder if AL should do the cut ?

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^ Let the jacket hang a day. Then apply some steam via a steam iron/steamer. Crinkles should come out, unless its linen or something - in which case, congrats on the wrinkles.

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LIke "6" suggested, let it hang. If creases persist, try the following ( if it's just at the back at waist level):

 

Set iron to the lower end of wool setting, no steam, cover portion to be pressed with a hankerchief or cloth, place iron on it with some pressure from you for 15 seconds. Do not move iron around like ironing shirts. Iron is immobile.

 

Lift iron. Do not touch jacket or hankerchief for 60 seconds. Reposition hankerchief and repeat procedure on neighbouring part.

 

Avoid pressing the side seams.

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I think I might have not fixed the problem. Tried the kotmj alternative since I don't really have an iron that kicks out pure steam. Might take it to AL tmrw lol since he is right in front of my office,

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So I had a bunch of leather goods that I had not taken care of in a long time. The conventional wisdom is to use a glycerin-based saddle soap and sponge the goods down. It's what some saddle-makers recommend. I've never liked saddle soap, the thing is so foul.

 

Apparently the whole point of caring for leather is to remove surface grime, to restore moisture level, and to give the surface a lubricating wax layer that makes it less susceptible to scuffs.

 

I talked to Myron Glaser about how to care for leather. He said to sponge it with a coconut-oil based soap and to rub in some Nivea Hand Cream. He says this way, you're using pharmaceutical grade stuff that is food safe and not poisonous. Turns out that like skin, leather needs glycerin to stop it from drying out and cracking.

 

Went to Carrefour. Found a colourless and fragrance-free soap called Simple that has a very short ingredients list. I had hoped to find the amber Neutragena glycerin soap but it wasn't available.

simple.jpg

 

I found Nivea Hand Cream, but it has all kinds of vitamins and almond oil and UV protectors and titanium dioxide not to mention fragrance. So I went for Neutragena Hand Cream, which is a simple formulation. All I'm looking for is really the glycerin.

neutragena.jpg

 

I used a microfiber cloth and dampened that with the soap and water and rubbed the goods down. Then I applied the hand cream with my hands. It works extremely well. Very happy with this solution. However this hand cream has no wax -- it's water based. So the surface after treatment is matt and non-greasy. Probably no scuff protection.

 

soap1.jpg

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I'm trying this solution when I travel next. It's a collapsible travelling iron and a hand pressing pad. The pad is made of dense cotton filling covered in a cotton moleskin. You wear the thing like an oven mitt. It's like a handheld tailor's buck.

P7103801.jpg

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Not sure where to ask this but im actually looking for a wardrobe. Just to store trousers and a couple of odd jackets + accessories. Any recommendation? Nothing hangar project because that will blow my budget :P

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So I had a bunch of leather goods that I had not taken care of in a long time. The conventional wisdom is to use a glycerin-based saddle soap and sponge the goods down. It's what some saddle-makers recommend. I've never liked saddle soap, the thing is so foul.

 

Apparently the whole point of caring for leather is to remove surface grime, to restore moisture level, and to give the surface a lubricating wax layer that makes it less susceptible to scuffs.

 

I talked to Myron Glaser about how to care for leather. He said to sponge it with a coconut-oil based soap and to rub in some Nivea Hand Cream. He says this way, you're using pharmaceutical grade stuff that is food safe and not poisonous. Turns out that like skin, leather needs glycerin to stop it from drying out and cracking.

 

Went to Carrefour. Found a colourless and fragrance-free soap called Simple that has a very short ingredients list. I had hoped to find the amber Neutragena glycerin soap but it wasn't available.

 

I found Nivea Hand Cream, but it has all kinds of vitamins and almond oil and UV protectors and titanium dioxide not to mention fragrance. So I went for Neutragena Hand Cream, which is a simple formulation. All I'm looking for is really the glycerin.

 

I used a microfiber cloth and dampened that with the soap and water and rubbed the goods down. Then I applied the hand cream with my hands. It works extremely well. Very happy with this solution. However this hand cream has no wax -- it's water based. So the surface after treatment is matt and non-greasy. Probably no scuff protection.

 

 

Monsieur kotmj,

What about suede? What kind of soap will you use for suede? I remembered you said you soaped your suede things.

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Yes I'm curious about suede too. I just brushed a pair of Church's suede bucks. Held them under running water and brushed with an old toothbrush. And I might have used some baby shampoo. They needed intensive cleaning after an unfortunate night out involving too much soju and Guinness. I put them out to dry in the open for about two days. I forgot to stuff them with newspaper, but the insides of the shoe actually weren't wet. Now that they are dry, I still see water stains on them. The part that came in contact with the water is a shade or two darker. So I wonder what I should do to restore the colour? I haven't brushed them with a suede brush yet because it's not with me. Will it help, though? I feel like it might not just be a matter of brushing the nap in the same direction.

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I washed my suede shoe before going to Singapore. This is the third time in 3 years I washed the shoe. It improved the shoe.

 

I put it under a tap and rinsed it. It didn't really work since it was impregnated with this water-repellent dye that I use. I then took the multi-feature suede brush (that is a crepe brush on one side and a combination nylon and brass bristle brush on the other) and soaped it up and started scrubbing the shoe in circular motions. The foam was dirty, so I knew it was working. I rinsed the shoe, even on the inside to remove some of the salt in the insole (not to mention the lint accumulation deep in the toebox). I used a wet rag to scrub the insole.

 

By now the water-repellency is gone and I scrubbed the shoe once more with the nylon and brass bristle brush, with soap, of course. I did a few rounds of this because each time the foam lifted more dirt.

 

Rinsed it, patted it dry with a rag, inserted shoe trees and left for a few days. The insole grew some fungus which I had to wipe away.

 

I would normally impregnate the shoe now with a Woly water-repellent dye to restore the colour and to give it some protection from the elements, but I forgot.

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Hi guys (and gals).....Jeff Walmsley here from Jeeves. A really great message board.

 

F1refighter, thank you for your compliments and I again apologize for having a lapel pressed. We do hundreds of jackets and never press the lapel so I am a little baffled how that might have happened. Glad we got it sorted for you however! Funny enough I get scolded a couple of time a month by customers who say we forgot to put a crease in their lapel :-)

 

Kotmj - I just wanted to follow up on your nice post regarding steaming of suit jackets. With respect I would say that in the past it might have been more correct that jackets should not be steamed, but with modern fabrics and construction techniques steaming should not be an issue in a professional dry cleaning environment. Having said that once something is steamed it is important to remove the steam which sadly is not possible at home with a steamer. We have have various techniques to remove steam - primarily forced warm air or vacuum. Vacuum sets a fabric after it has been steamed and is critical. Having spent time in some of the finest dry cleaners in Europe I can confirm the application of steam and vacuum is common

 

We also use a device called a form finisher designed for finishing jackets. The device, in addition to applying steam and forced hot air also creates mild tension throughout the jacket to return the garment to it's original shape post dry cleaning

 

Garment manufacturers should not intentionally stretch and shrink fabrics through hand ironing. In fact It's technically not possible to shrink fabric with an iron. Material can be stretched through the application of steam and vacuum is than used to set the material. Often fabrics get stretched during the production of the fabric when they go onto large spools. It's an undesirable effect of the production process of fabrics. When garments are washed and they shrink it's called "relaxation shrinkage" and what's really happening is the fabric is simply returning to the size it was before going onto the spool. Incidentally this type of shrinkage is often easily reversed through the application of steam, tension and vacuum.

 

One other poster also mentioned the "bubbling" of the fabric. Technically this is called delamination and is caused by a breaking down of the resins used during fusing of two fabrics. Delamanation can occur the first time a garment is cleaned or the 20th time a garment is cleaned. In any event this is absolutely a manufacturing defect and the manufacturer should be contacted. Not all suits are fused....but most are. Brioni for instance (pretty sure about this) isn't fused. Perhaps I will double check with Mr. Lee at Brioni (KLCC)

 

At any rate.....hopefully have not ruffled any feathers....simply trying to add a little information regarding what is often a mysterious process.

 

Again...really great board.

 

regards,

 

Jeff Walmsley

Jeeves

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Welcome to the forum Jeff and thanks for the post.

 

Fabrics do get shrunk everyday with a hand iron. It is not possible to make a jacket without shrinking some parts. I can give many examples, but I'll give you the opportunity to ask Mr Lee of Brioni about this first!

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Jeff, I've been meaning to ask this of a dry cleaning specialist a long time: Do you really dry clean shirts or do you wet launder them?

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Picked my suit up. Everything looks pretty impeccable. No funny fragrance or anything.

 

Lapels were definitely not pressed flat. Can't say much about the roll since it's not fully canvased anyway.

 

 

Only thing is that the buttons (the default black plastic ones that Ah Loke uses) have a weird whitish powdery look on them. I haven't really tried to wipe them yet, but I wonder what it is or if it's supposed to be there.

 

Despite that, I won't hesitate to use Jeeves again.

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