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#41 Zinzan

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:42 AM

Thanks Kotjm, guess dont need to invest on steamer.

#42 "6"

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 04:41 PM

Yes the post is very informative indeed. Thanks kotmj! I usually use the steamer every 3-4 wearings as I think it will help get the funk out - I don't dry clean my suits unless they are stained with curry or something. So I guess I'll just steam the trousers from now on. And allow the jacket adequate time between wearings to air out.

#43 terrorsquad

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 10:40 AM

A very usefull video for those who plan to do it on their own

http://www.englishcut.com/

#44 "6"

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 03:46 PM

Great videos. Thanks for linking this Terror.

#45 Zinzan

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:02 PM

Good stuff TS.

#46 Zinzan

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:42 AM

I have managed to press my own suits. I am darn proud of myself. Managed to get lapels to roll again rather than flattened.

#47 kotmj

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 02:57 PM

Haha, bravo! I think there's a DIY guy in you.

#48 Zinzan

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 06:27 PM

Deep deep down there somewhere.

#49 ElPistolero

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 10:21 PM

what ironing board do you guys use?

brabantia is having a promo on one of their boards so i went to check it out. i was hoping to find a heavy and stable board, but unfortnately it is just slightly better than my current medical hall one which i paid rm30 for.

#50 Bkt

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 04:05 PM

Came home to find out that my family acquired a Phillips steamer,

http://www.productre...nt-steamer.html

After giving it a go at 1 very creased shirt 2 chinos a pair of shorts and a T shirt, I came to understand that as for now im using it like an iron anyway's using my left hand as a make shift board and the steamer on my right hand slowly steaming away at the garments, it does not do well if hard creases but its fairly quick for simple things such as the shorts and T shirt. I guess if i were to use it longer I would acquire the skill to operate it faster.

From a first time perspective I don't see it replacing my standard steam iron

Thoughts?

#51 kotmj

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:01 PM

I spend a fair amount of time in places where clothes are made and I must admit I've never seen a steamer in use. Doesn't mean I think it has no use, just an observation. However, I've seen it being used at a dry cleaner's. Shopping malls use these on new clothes that have gotten wrinkled after customers try them on.

I get the feeling they work great on non-iron clothes. But none of the cloths used for bespoke shirts are non-iron so the iron it has to be.

#52 kotmj

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:04 PM

Let me tell you of a tool every tailor has but which is never seen in homes. Its use gives you razor sharp creases on trousers and very flat seams everywhere else.

After this whisky.

#53 kotmj

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:20 PM

So... see... fibers become malleable under elevated temperatures and moisture. That's what a steam iron does. It provides moisture and high temperatures. But tailors have one extra thing households don't.

It' s called a clapper. Oftentimes made of wood, but aluminum works just as well. You use it immediately after the steam iron. You would press a part -- say a seam -- then immediately after lifting the iron you place the clapper on it. What the clapper does is it allows the hot and moist part of the cloth to cool down and dry up while in a flat position. It "sets" the cloth. Every tailor uses his clapper dozens of times a day. Every tailpor has one. Every tailor uses it after pressing a seam.

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#54 kenterong

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:40 PM

saw this in action, after having read about it somewhere online.

#55 kotmj

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:53 PM

It becomes clear why steaming a suit is such a bad idea. It relaxes the cloth, and this relaxed cloth then cools down and dries up. The jacket loses it's crispness this way. A tailor uses a wooden clapper so that the cloth sets while it is under pressure, thus making seams very flat and pleats razor sharp.

#56 joonian

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:58 PM

I need some help resetting my jackets. They are starting to look a little bit too unstructured

(null)

#57 residentdandy

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:00 AM

My apologies for digressing --how often do you dryclean your suit trousers, or any other pairs of pure wool trousers?

In fact, does anyone here wash them in water?

The latter is strongly discouraged by the good folks at Iris.

p.s. I have also witnessed discolouration of the metal side tabs as a result of washing.

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#58 kotmj

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:16 AM

Wool should never be agitated in water because it felts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felt

I know I don't have my wool trousers dry cleaned often enough. I just found a shop very near my place that does really good dry cleaning.

#59 residentdandy

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:23 AM

Neither do I, but that's just me being a cheapskate. :P

Is the felting due to the washing machine or the water? I've read somewhere that handwashing in cold water isn't so bad, but...

Maybe it's time to try wool-polyester ble --okay no, let's try not to go down that path.

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#60 kotmj

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:31 AM

The felting is due to the scales and kinks on the individual wool fibers. Agitating wool in water causes the fibers to catch and bind to each other, making the garment shrink.




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