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holymoly

Everything Digital Photography

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Today's dusk over here was particularly photogenic. After a very nice dinner, I walked the dog.

IMG_20141206_185033_edited_zpse4095631.j

 

Well actually, I don't really walk the dog. Too boring. We either play fetch, or if I forgot to bring something to throw, we just chase each other.

IMG_20141206_185416_edited_zpsdcc3494c.j

 

See, without a dog, I would have no reason to go out into nature. I would be in my apartment, watching YouTube.

 

After the walk, I drove over to the closest McD for a coffee and pie.

IMG_20141206_190953_edited_zpsf6a0fe2e.j

 

Alas I did not bring along a proper camera. All pictures with the Mi3.

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When I post process a photo, I aim for realism. After all, they're supposed to be memories. However, magazines like National Geographic process their photos for visual impact: crazy contrast, unreal saturation, etc. Here, I do a National Geographic on the above photo.

 

maxng_zps0b9bf2b3.jpg

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i think the discussion about contrast/saturation is really a grey area (pun somewhat intended).

 

to me, it all depends on what the photographer had in mind, when making the picture.

 

what also goes into this decision-making process is the equipment he chooses to use to make the picture.

 

img0010.jpg

 

this picture was shot with a nikon fm2 and nikkor 17-35mm f2.8, on a roll of rpx 400 (maybe i should be posting this in the analog photography thread).

 

it's clear to see that this is a very contrasty image.

 

while the nikon fm2 doesn't contribute to the contrast, the choice of lens and emulsion did.

 

after all, all lensmakers will tout their products as having good contast. then, there's also the use of such tools like the (circular) polarizer. films with crazy saturation like velvia wouldn't be flying off the shelf without good reason.

 

perhaps,  it all boils down to whether the post processing was done 'tastefully', and hits the spot for the target audience.

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No sure whether this is the best place to post this question. I have been thinking about how to get accurate representation of fabric colours on digital photos. I wonder if a colourchecker helps. 

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For the purpose of accurate color representation in digital photographs, I would recommend shooting the fabric on a white piece of paper. If your digital photographic tool of choice has the capability of setting white balance manually, then this white piece of paper serves as the reference point.

 

Also, if you're not averse to post processing, you can also correct the white balance of the image at that stage (again, using the white piece of paper as the reference point).

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Actually grey is a better colour for white balance correction. There are grey cards sold in camera stores for this purpose.

 

Using a calibration device on your monitor is a different thing altogether. Even if your colour is accurate on your screen, your clients may not see the exact same colour on his monitor.

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True, you can also use an 18% grey card for the same purpose.

 

The only reason I recommended using a white piece of paper is because it's easier to find.

 

Indeed, monitor color calibration is a separate matter in itself. It's kind of a moot point doing all these white balance corrections in-camera or in post processing, if your customer doesn't have calibrated screen.

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I have been advised to upgrade my tie quality pics, I have a Panasonic 9 year old FX-5 with Leica Lenses.

 

Can i achieve pics as this from my ties, a client did for me?

 

admbk4.jpg

 

 

If not, what do i need?


ANY

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On couple of trips to Tokyo, I browsed through second hand sections of large electronic shops as well as second hand shops. Not one single Canon M in sight. It is as though even the Japanese are embarrassed by the production of Canon M. At the same time, a colleague of mine bought a Nikon 1 J5 and proclaimed it a toy self-deprecatingly. 

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Maybe you did not see the M because they are still with their owners who still use them regularly? I still use my M -- it is an amazing camera. The EF-M lenses are also stellar. I even bought the 90EX flash for it a few days ago.

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