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The Polo Shirt


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#21 monsieurxu

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 10:08 AM


Don't see it anywhere on the product itself but an embroidered logo on the chest would be a deal breaker

 

 

I agree too, and that's one bugbear I have with most current polos on the market. A cheap and obnoxious looking logo on the chest.

 

In fact what motivated me to produce my own line of polos was because of all the inadequacies and compromises with current polos. Not a single one I saw or felt was good enough in my opinion. So with my polos, I've set out to fix all the bugbears - among which include crappy fabric, naff logos, limp collars, poor fit and cut (so it doesn't stay tucked in) etc.

 

My polos are cut like shirts, with a curved shirt hem (we can do a straight hem if you prefer to have it tucked out, but I personally think it looks better tucked in), a yoke, finely-sewn side seams and fully pick-stitched shoulders and armholes (your move, Napoli). 

 

Since you can't get polos or other clothes made from pique fabric done at a tailor (some do supply but they're all outsourced to factories), then the obvious choice is to search out a provider of polos of the highest quality. I hope I can rise to that challenge. 

 

My embroidered Paladin Helmet is blind-stitched on the right cuff, so it'll be the same colour as the body of the polo. The short-sleeved ones will have the Helmet on the right bicep (that's where most folks who wear short-sleeved polos want them).

 

If the client requests, we can put the Helmet on the inside back of the polo, so it's not visible at all. But in the interests of brand integrity, we will not do a Helmet-less polo.

 

In Spore/Malaysia, I wear the polo with the cuff folded up to the elbow, so no logo is visible. Under a jacket, it's also covered. The polo cuff looks great with shots together with a Celadon watch, naturally ;)


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#22 monsieurxu

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 10:20 AM

Hopefully the polos come in more conventional colours as well - white, black, heather greys, forest green, etc. - in the pique fabric.

 

Definitely.. We're doing two lines for the Superfine Pique Polos - RTW and Bespoke. I call it superfine because it is ridiculously fine, the nicest pique fabric I've yet found on my worldwide search.

 

The RTW selection will have the classic colours - navy, heathered cream (gorgeous), forest green, heathered grey and a few others. The Bespoke selection will have free rein of our entire palette, which is vast.

 

I've just posted a shot of the sleeve cuff of a navy polo. It shows the hand-stitched crow's foot buttons on the sleeve and cuff. There're in all 12 hand-stitched buttons on every PaladinPolo with a buttondown collar (10 on the spread collar).


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#23 monsieurxu

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 10:27 AM

Anyhoos, our RTW polos are priced at 225 USD, and Bespoke is 325 USD. This will be for the Superfine Pique Cotton. Celadon Connoisseurs receive a 15% price reduction.

 

By the way, the Superfine Pique Cotton may be soft and refined, but it is 220g (8 ozs) which could qualify as summer jacketing. Doesn't wear warm at all though, cooler than my Bonfanti linen-cotton shirts in fact.

 

Now that we're still in our soft launch phase for the next week or so, I'd like to offer all Kerbau members a complimentary upgrade to a Bespoke Polo. Just PM me here or on facebook with your order (choice of colour, cuffs, collar etc) and Kerbau username!

 

We're also going to do turtlenecks and travel safari-style jackets in the pique cotton, and Mulberry Silk polos. Also some womenswear on the side, but that's just for my own fun. Will tell you guys more as we go along...


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#24 "6"

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 10:55 AM

Pfft, too proletariat. Borgeois polos are in burnt orange, purple, celadon, chalkstripes, houndstooth, etc.



To better blend in with the crowd when escaping the revolution I guess.

Or when trying to be elected to office.

#25 takashi

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 04:04 PM

At those prices you are competing with Ascot Chang IMO.

 

Send JT a review piece perhaps? ;)



#26 riggy

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 05:11 PM

USD225 is a heck of a lot of Malaysian RM. I can actually get some totally well known stuff for less than that but the effort is commendable for going all the way for something as basic as a polo shirt.

 

But your shirts have given me an idea. I think I am going to crow's feet stitch all the buttons on the polo shirts that I have. Even my 65/35 fruit of the loom that are dirt cheap is going to get that treatment. 

 

Out comes the sewing kit.


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#27 monsieurxu

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 09:01 PM

Well my products have always been positioned at the top end of the market. I've always preferred to do things to the absolute best I can, otherwise why bother? 

 

When Pagani or Koenigsegg first began, they were also compared with the likes of Ferrari. But they really appeal to two different crowds. Ultimately, do you want to pay top dollar for a well-known name, or unsurpassed quality and design? I don't know of any competing polo that can compare with ours; if you guys do then do share - I'll take note and surpass them in the next batch! ;)


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#28 kotmj

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 11:30 PM

Well, the white Ascot Chang x The Armoury polo in the first post of this thread was RM900. That's RTW. These things are capitalistwear.

#29 kotmj

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 11:40 PM

In fact, that very polo is shown under this DB (not that much of it is visible):
1-IMG_20151017_100726_zpskqgdlr7h.jpg

#30 riggy

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:44 AM

Well, the white Ascot Chang x The Armoury polo in the first post of this thread was RM900. That's RTW. These things are capitalistwear.

IMG_20150415_233935.jpg

 

Well, I am familiar with RM900 Polo shirts. Or RM1600 ones. I usually buy them when they are on crazy discounts from certain Italian brands. When it comes to retail. I almost never pay full price. Like the Brioni above. I like them because they have not a single stitched logo on them at all. Only the labels and small print on the buttons. No advertising at all.

 

This is one of about five or seven Brioni polos that I have. It is cotton pique. When new it felt smooth and silky. Thin and unlike any the brand with the Horse on the front. It felt it was worth a million bucks (mainly because it was a Brioni lah....) with its tags and packaging. MOP buttons, shirt style collar, that luxury cotton knitted finer than any Ralp Loren,  Uniglo, Muji, etc etc can every be. It also looks great with a jacket obviously. But then again, it is by Brioni. Canali is pretty good too....especially when on 70% sale at JPO.

 

But because it is made of a finer material, It requires a more personal touch when it comes to maintaining it. I handwash the items myself most of the time like I do my better quality super long below the knee socks - this is a good tip if you want things to last many years...and most of my stuff do.

 

You cannot even scrub the collar hard as if you do so it will fray where it folds over (where your neck stains it the most). Machine washing it would be okay but I would line dry them afterwards. No dryer. I prefer some of the polo shirts which are comfy last longer than normal (pique and jersey will lose its shape after a while). Basically anything thinner than what is offered by bread and butter brands like RL, uniglo has in store most of the time requires more TLC. I know. These 'cheaper' thicker cotton pique actually holds its shape longer from experience.

 

Of course, if you're trying to sell it, you'd want more of it to go out of shape faster or start fraying even more quickly. And of course, big time capitalists can afford a new polo shirt every few days or so. 


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#31 kotmj

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:50 PM

Now that you mentioned it, I fear for the durability of pique fabrics. Most of the cheap polos in pique that I have worn become irreversibly stretched rapidly with wear, losing any semblance of its original dimension. This is a weakness of the weave, I think.

Part of the value proposition of expensive things is durability. When it manifests wear, that wear should have charm associated with it. That way, the cost-per-use remains low.

Most people recognise regular business shirts as being very good value despite the price because they have no problems wearing shirts from many years ago. The cost-per-use is extremely low. I keep hearing people tell me, oh, I had some shirts made from so and so five years ago and I'm still wearing them. In fact, the laundry costs (if outsourced, something like RM9, according to one customer) is the largest cost component. Me, I just throw them all in a washing machine. I don't want to have my shirts washed with other people's shirts, and it's too much trouble for me to drive to a dry cleaner.)

I think pique needs to be chemically cleaned with relatively little mechanical agitation. Meaning, the detergent needs to do most of the job. Household detergents are not strong enough.

(Shirts are not dry cleaned, even when sent to a dry cleaner. They are washed in water with detergent. However, dry cleaners may have access to stronger and more sophisticated detergents than what can be found in supermarkets. They may also have superior technique.)

#32 riggy

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 09:10 PM

Actually, cotton pique is indeed a fragile material. I just started digging out some of my older polo shirts. Mainly to see if I could 'upgrade' them a little (by adding crows foot stitched buttons and pick stitching).... I have already done three polo shirts - this RM18 fruit of the loom one, another RM15 bought in Taiping many moons ago but seldom wore it and another one by budget RL - Chaps that I bought at F.O.S. 

 

So this....F.O.T.Loom.

 

IMG_20151020_172050.jpg

 

Has become this...

 

IMG_20151020_180922.jpg

 

Imagine the advert now going...handsewn crows foot buttons (and pickstiched shoulders) by a grown  man from Petaling Jaya who does not do this thing for a living ..... So much more prestige no?

 

Anyway. Because I can actually do this. The novelty of handsewn stuff has dropped down a couple of rungs. Too lazy to do buttonholes though. Hard work. Eyestrain. Lack of patience. other excuses.

 

So back to cotton pique. I noticed that the shirts made out of thicker and rougher pique outlasted the thinner, finer stuff. Pique also gets out of shape slightly less quicker than jersey. But since most of the jersey are tshirts, they end up being super comfy shirts to use at home. Out of shape pique collared shirts end up sitting at the sidelines. So yes, I do wash my own polo shirts. And no....strong detergent will destroy cotton pique in colours too. They will fade a little too. I think chemical cleaning pique is also a little bit extreme. Cotton fibers arent tough enough to handle dry cleaning. I once had a shirt drycleaned. After the third round it died. The cotton fibers gave way. The dhobi wallah obviously dry cleaned the darn thing instead of what you said...a wash with detergent. But this was those days. In 2000 I think. Local drycleaners have improved since them. But I wouldnt dryclean pique still though.

 

So I wash them at home, the expensive ones...using gentle detergent, scrubbing very lightly. Once washed, it will be on a hangar that is nicely wide so that the shoulders sit nicely on them. The excess water will be squeezed a little by hand so that there is no extra weight of the water at the base of the shirt that will elongate the shirt. Same thing will happen with pique if you scrub or pull an area too hard. It will widen sideways If you dry pique in the dryer for the first time it may shrink one whole size. That is another issue.

 

So when it is on the hangar I will button all the buttons so that the shape of the polo is maintained whilst it is hanging. Air dry but if its dried indoors there will be a fan blowing a gentle breeze to it. 

 

Dress shirts are easy. They last a very very long time. I still have some shirts from 1997 I think. Some have frayed at the collars and cuffs but are perfectly wearable. if I wanted them fixed I can even go to the tailor and just change the collar and cuffs with a similar cloth. Of course, that would be a little bit mad as one of  the shirts in question was a Clairborne for Men bought at reject shop for RM30 at that point of time. This also shows that even cheap stuff lasts a lifetime. Whether this is a good thing or not is debatable.

 

So yes. It is because of this and my earlier posting that I always cap my polo shirts to a certain price way WAY way way below USD225. Of course. I am the exception from the norm. 


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#33 "6"

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 09:23 PM

Actually, cotton pique is indeed a fragile material. 

 

Out of shape pique collared shirts...  

 

 

Translated into marketing speak:

 

Polo shirts made of superfine cotton pique fabric, which has been pre-washed and treated for softer handfeel.

 

These shirts gain a warm patina and tons of character with regular wear - imparting an elegantly disheveled, but still 'put together' look which is reminisce of the classic gentlemen of days past, holidaying in southern Italy.

 

Whilst yacht and beach ready - throw a blazer over these polos and you'll be ready for a night out on the town as well. 



#34 kotmj

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 05:15 PM

All about polo shirt material by Sunspel
http://info.sunspel..../luxury-fabrics

#35 kotmj

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 06:22 PM

Found Swiss-made, US-distributed polo shirt material. MOQ is however 3 bolts per invoice.
pima_wale_pique-80-qpr_01_zpskw8afsqs.jp

#36 kotmj

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 01:04 AM

I can already imagine the conversation the college student who works for Sava on the weekends will be having:

Sava: The lime looks really good on you.

Customer: *sighs*

Sava: An uncommon and unexpected colour but very wearable.

Customer: Can I substitute one of the champagnes with this lime? Can you tell me what the order is like now?

Sava: Sure. So that's two instead of three champagnes, one lime, two whites, one each of ecru, cream, pink, light blue, mauve, royal blue, brown and black. Also one jeans in non-fading black and one in the 14 oz. Kurabo, both with leather patches and hot branded initials. Stealth stitching on the black and two-tone on the Kurabo.

#37 kotmj

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 12:02 PM

Once I'm done with my coffee, I'm getting out to Shah Alam where a shirt buttonhole machine is waiting for me. It's a fully mechanical Brother. The conventional wisdom amongst tailors and sewing machine repairmen is that Brother made the most reliable shirt buttonholers. The retail price for a used Brother is RM5k. It never goes below 4k. I'm picking mine up for RM2K. I have no real need for a shirt buttonholer -- I did fine for years without one. My shirtmaker has one. But the price is too good, and it may be of use someday.

#38 kotmj

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 12:05 PM

It's exactly this model. 40kg of metal to sew a simple buttonhole.
https://youtu.be/VO0hwbhzENQ

#39 kotmj

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 12:37 PM

I'm also looking forward to meet the Indian lady seller who I talked with briefly over the phone. She closed her sewing business 3 years ago and has been sitting on the machines ever since. It's rare to talk to someone over the phone who sounds so intrinsically happy.




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