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The watch appreciation thread

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The only way to impress non-WIS is to get a Richard Mille or one of the Royal Oaks with complication, preferably chrono. Or an Invicta.

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I think for you Jeremy -  a nice PP Nautilus. Somewhat more restrained than the Royal Oak. 

 

 

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I have this customer who wears this fake Nautilus. Every time he's in the shop, he takes it off and plunks it on the table, dial facing me. Sometimes he wears a fake Daytona. Does the same with it.

I hope he isn't reading this.

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IMG_20180614_160427.jpg?raw=1

Tudor Black Bay 36. Cute as hell. 36mm diameter, 1cm thick. Oyster bracelet on par with current Rolexes but with a simpler clasp. ETA 2824, adjusted by Tudor to practically COSC standard. 150m water resistance. Lume is brighter than on Seiko dive watches. RM9k after the usual discount.

Kinda tempted, but there are many great watches out there. Also, it has no date, NO DATE! Argh.

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Something about the BB 36mm looks off to me. Could it be that the hands are too big in relation to the dial? Or maybe the maxi sized indices? I don't know, but on paper its technically perfect, but when I see it in person, something is...missing. 

You should also consider the BB 36's older cousin the 1016 Rolex Explorer 1. Probably more suited for someone of your stature. This example has so much charm. Will appreciate with time for sure, jajaja. But no date, I don't think you miss it on this beautiful dial though.

https://www.chrono24.co.uk/rolex/1016-vintage-explorer-i-gilt-glossy-tropical-dial-27402--id8532171.htm

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6 hours ago, "6" said:

Will appreciate with time for sure, jajaja. 

Not if I wear it, jajaja

Went on IG and searched for bb36. There is a pic of one next to the current Explorer 1. I have to say I prefer the Explorer.

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I really enjoy living in Bukit Tinggi. Such a contrast to KL/PJ.

My younger brother bought an admittedly nice condo recently. It has a pretty genial architecture, not just interior architecture, but the exterior is unlike anything I've seen and has sort of broken from the apartment mould. I've been up many condos, especially in Mont Kiara, in the earlier part of my career. They're all the same. They're really just apartments. 

However, the macro aspects are all wrong. Urban living is just all wrong.

It's much better here. That's why I commute everyday.

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Today, on the wrists of customers, I saw a

a ) Cartier Ballon Bleu in 42mm. Looks like an alarm clock on the wrist.

b ) Chopard Mille Miglia, latest model. Looks wonderful!

c ) Cartier Santos, two-tone, in midsize. Not for me.

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1 hour ago, kotmj said:

c ) Cartier Santos, two-tone, in midsize. Not for me.

 

What do you think of the Cartier Tank Francaise? Softer lines, less in-your-face.

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I have no real opinion of the Tank. Cartier, and most of the European watch producers appealed to their wearers not so much through sheer design as they do through sheer quality of execution. The Tank was from that era.

We live in an era where computer aided manufacturing enables even very cheap watches be made at very high quality. So now, you have to add value through design and intangibles (aka marketing).

Cartier of course understands this. I am a big admirer of their relatively  new 42mm Calibre de Cartier, an incredible design feat. It is very, very, ohhhhh verrrrry difficult to organise this most viscous world populated by overwhelmingly unimpressive humans such that such a thing is possible

 

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The point was, if you have a Tank, you'll love it to death because it is exquisite and beautifully made. But the world has gotten a lot more competitive, and it is inconceivable for Cartier to introduce the Tank today had it not been introduced earlier. The sort of designs that sell today are more complex and extroverted.

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I just made my first major (relative to my income) watch purchase. The wound in the bank account is fresh, bloody, gaping. 

 

I dont think I will make a habit of it, dropping this much money on a liability; a non-income producing item, with close to zero chance of appreciation. 

 

It was purchased through an online watch marketplace, so I hope I dont receive a copy watch from Thailand. 

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17 hours ago, "6" said:

I just made my first major (relative to my income) watch purchase. The wound in the bank account is fresh, bloody, gaping. 

 

I dont think I will make a habit of it, dropping this much money on a liability; a non-income producing item, with close to zero chance of appreciation. 

 

It was purchased through an online watch marketplace, so I hope I dont receive a copy watch from Thailand. 

Did you buy something made half a century ago which has had 4 prior owners 3 of whom are dead?

That's also my problem with watches. I can use RM30k to stunning effect---for instance, that's almost a year's salary for a young writer, whom I could hire to write content for my website blog which then brings in lots of people who would otherwise not have encountered JT. If I use that for a watch, it just sits on my wrist and accumulates dents and scratches.

However, we were evolved to be viscerally attracted to pretty, shiny, wearable things. Ask Rosmah.

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No - nothing that old or all that interesting. It’s a relatively modern piece. If it ever arrives and is authentic I will reveal more. 

 

Jeremy - have your cake and eat it too. 

 

Borrow the RM30,000 on a 0% interest credit card with a 24 month interest free period. Buy the watch today. RM 1,250 repayment per month over 24 months. 

 

Hire said writer for RM 2,500 per month (RM30k a year).

 

Total additional monthly outgoing created is now RM3,750. 

 

Assuming a conservative markup of 66% per suit, at a hypothetical selling price of RM4,500 per 2 piece suit, means around RM3,000 gross margin. 

 

From RM3,000, less RM1,200 to fund other overheads, you keep around RM1,800 before depreciation, amortisation, and tax. 

 

Which means the writer would need to generate an extra 2.1 suits per month over 24 months to self-fund their salary and cost of watch.

 

Banker logic win. 

 

*the above is for comedic purposes only and does not constitute real financial advice. 

 

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This channel is so profound for newbie like me.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8sQPstJRqA

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On 6/30/2018 at 9:49 PM, "6" said:

No - nothing that old or all that interesting. It’s a relatively modern piece. If it ever arrives and is authentic I will reveal more. 

 

Jeremy - have your cake and eat it too. 

 

Borrow the RM30,000 on a 0% interest credit card with a 24 month interest free period. Buy the watch today. RM 1,250 repayment per month over 24 months. 

 

Hire said writer for RM 2,500 per month (RM30k a year).

 

Total additional monthly outgoing created is now RM3,750. 

 

Assuming a conservative markup of 66% per suit, at a hypothetical selling price of RM4,500 per 2 piece suit, means around RM3,000 gross margin. 

 

From RM3,000, less RM1,200 to fund other overheads, you keep around RM1,800 before depreciation, amortisation, and tax. 

 

Which means the writer would need to generate an extra 2.1 suits per month over 24 months to self-fund their salary and cost of watch.

 

Banker logic win. 

 

*the above is for comedic purposes only and does not constitute real financial advice. 

 

How is it that, for yourself you purchase a "relatively modern" watch, but for me you recommend things that have 5X polished case, on its third replacement crystal, deteriorated dial, and crumbly, discoloured lume which no longer functions as lume, and four prior owners three of whom are dead?

Rhetorical question. I'm much taken by your financial modeling. It's so convincing. Only thing holding me back is, I do not buy these sort of things on credit. In fact, I buy everything with cash. I'm sure such an arbitrary policy is holding me back from fully indulging in the possibilities available. Always wanted serti dials and platinum fluted bezels.

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s-l1600.jpg

During WW1, the German navy had very many of these sort of watches produced. They were used by the officers on board ships. They were produced to a common specification: Black Arabic numerals on a silver dial, railroad track markers, subsidiary seconds dial, a power reserve indicator, and blued spade hands. The dial is often without any branding, but you can see the manufacturer's mark on the movement. A. Lange & Soehne was a particularly prolific producer of these, but there were several others.

s-l1600.jpg

All the seafaring nations of that time produced marine chronometers of a similar style. But the style you see above is specifically German. (The Swiss liked using Roman numerals on theirs.) I first encountered this style of watch through the work of D. Dornblueth. When I first heard of him maybe 15 years ago, he was still making every watch himself. Back then, if my memory serves me, you could purchase one for RM6000.

DB-039.jpg

When I got re-interested in watches again recently, I thought I would survey the options available in this style. It was pointless looking to the Swiss. Hamilton produces something in this mould, but it's a design for design's sake. Somewhere at Hamilton, a designer is quite gleeful at the work he has done but to me he is stupid. Ulysse Nardin is very big in this category, but it is very Swiss and not what I am looking for, not to mention priced beyond me (Maybe. Didnt really check.)

Those who are true to this style are all Germans. Stowa makes the Marine Original. But I find it a weak design. Achimede, as usual, didn't understand what it was doing in its version. Steinhart's version cannot be taken seriously. I eventually found an obscure Polish guy who makes a very good homage to this style. His design, I thought, is good enough to be worth trying out. After a few weeks in transit, the G.Gerlach Batory arrived today.

IMG_0769.jpg?raw=1 

Let me give you the fundamentals: 40mm, glossy enamelled dial, curved and AR coated sapphire crystal, Seagull automatic movement with the higest degree of factory finishing, which, in this case means perlage on most of the visible surfaces. The movement was adjusted in Poland for higher accuracy than stock. Despite not having a screwed down crown and a having a pusher, it is rated to 100m water resistance.

IMG_0780.jpg?raw=1  

The designer understood that a proper homage to this style would have to conform to the military specification of the original. I admire how bold and large the seconds dial is---the other homages have these tinnny sub second dials as if they are ashamed to have one. In the case of Steinhart, they use a central seconds hand, which is not period correct and which leaves too much white space on the dial.

IMG_0782.jpg?raw=1

Here you see the only minor complaint I have of the watch. It is 14mm thick. This is due to the big date complication. I thought I would be irritated by this thickness, but I find myself not noticing it.

IMG_0777.jpg?raw=1

I am extremely pleased with this purchase. I swapped the stock blue leather strap for the Nomos cordovan you see pictured. I ordered some accessories with the watch: a military green polyester strap and a sapphire display case back. With shipping, the entire package cost me RM1900.

Let me forewarn you. This watch is not on the same quality level of a Ball. Not even on the level of a Squale. It is made very well, but the Swiss watch ecosystem understands how to optimise for quality impression better than our lone designer in Poland and his Chinese component suppliers. Objectively, the materials and the construction techniques is similar to any Swiss watch. Yet, the Swiss know how to coax more out of a watch, giving the impression of higher quality, or of more exquisiteness. Nonetheless, I find this a very satisfying watch.

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parnis-men039s-portugal-style-automatic-

This is the sort of Seagull movement in the Gerlach. The picture above is of a...Parnis, which uses a similar factory-finished Seagull.

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