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kotmj

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TS, nak pinjam buku Le Snob boleh? :P I tried to look for it at Kinokuniya but it's listed as "not available".

 

I'm also looking for that coffee table book on Anderson & Sheppard. Seems like a great collection of photos of good looking people in nice looking clothes.

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I've got a couple of coffee table books including History of American Menswear, which is really great. Let's do a book swap or trade soon?

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Joonian : Sure. I just ordered Manton's 'The Suit', Alain Flussers 'Dressing The Man' and also Henry Poole's book on their history.What do you have currently?If I'm x mistaken, kotmj has Dege & Skinners book.I'm also looking to purchase Bruce Boyers book on Gary Cooper and James Sherwoods on Bespoke.

 

FF: Sure, x problem.I'll bring the book next time we meet up.It a good book for beginners, easy to carry around too!

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I've read Michael Lewis' The Big Short several years ago. A captivating book, a must-read. Liar's Poker is an earlier work by him. I do not like the way it is written -- all smart alec, wittier and sharper than thou -- but it is entertaining.

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So I finished reading Manton's book The Suit. Loaned to me by terror.

 

It has been said the language in the King James version of The Holy Bible was archaic even when it came out, and that this was deliberate because it allows for more melody and because an ecclesiastical work should not sound like the writing in the newspapers of the day.

 

Manton chose to wrought his work to the framework of The Prince. The language is archaic. The Prince was originally written for an Italian prince as a manual to the intricacies of mediaeval politics -- Manton chose to address his book to Lapo Elkann. Laughed my head off.

 

It's a very good book I can recommend to anyone who likes to know more about classic clothes for men. The work isn't superficial -- Manton gives advice even about the tiniest of details. It's lovingly written by an enthusiast, not just another job to pay the rent with by a style writer.

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Reading Tuesdays With Morrie. It is a real story by an author who visited an old dying professor once a week to talk about the major issues of life. Some quotes:

 

"The culture we have does not make people feel good about themselves. And you have to be strong enough to say if the culture doesn't work, don't buy it. Create your own. Most people can't do it."

 

"Once you learn how to die, you learn how to live."

 

"Because I know my time is almost done, I am drawn to nature like I'm seeing it for the first time."

 

"There are a few rules I know to be true about love and marriage: If you don't respect the other person, you're gonna have a lot of trouble. If you don't know how to compromise, you're gonna have a lot of trouble. If you can't talk openly about what goes on between you, you're gonna have a lot of trouble. And if you don't have a common set of values in life, you're gonna have a lot of trouble. Your values must be alike."

 

“Dying is only one thing to be sad over. Living unhappily is something else.”

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Stephen King's 'On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft'.

 

An excerpt:

It starts with this: put your desk in the corner, and every time you sit down there to write, remind yourself why it isn’t in the middle of the room. Life isn’t a support system for art. It’s the other way around.

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^ I recall the book differently.

 

I'm actually supposed to be drafting a few patterns now but this find is so great I can't wait to let you guys know.

 

THE CULT OF THE LUXURY BRAND: Inside Asia's Love Affair With Luxury.

 

 

But a well-endowed purse and free-spending ways are two different

matters. Singaporeans are obsessed with the price of everything. They

are entirely free of the Western reticence to discuss income and expenditure.

It’s routine in conversation for a Singaporean to ask: “What is

your salary? How much is your rent? What did you pay for those sunglasses?”

Whatever you did pay, a Singaporean can tell you where you

could have got them cheaper. In local parlance this is

 

kiasu, fear of losing

out. There is no dichotomy, for a Singaporean, in loving a bargain

and flaunting wealth, both at once. For example, a street hawker

described a Rolex-wearing customer who jumped out of his Mercedes,

opened a wallet thick with notes, and then argued for a considerable

time about the number of oysters he should have in his Sing$2

(US$1.25) omelette.

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