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#301 kotmj

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:58 PM

Sounds to me like an interface problem. Interfaces are really *hard*. Any interface requires incredible management, like the way between a cutter and coatmaker and trousermaker and shirtmaker. The cutter wants one thing, the coatmaker thinks something else.

At Airbus on the A380, the fuselages are split into sections and designed by separate teams. When they lined up the fuselage sections on the first couple of planes, nothing fits. Then they spend 2 months rewiring the connecting interface. I was there so I know.

#302 kotmj

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 01:30 AM

Downloading this now. "A Biology of Cancer" by Prof. Robert Weinberg.
http://www.amazon.co...P9Z6WEJ17EMTRHA

#303 kotmj

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 07:48 PM

The German Shepherd dog is probably the most respected breed and one of the most popular in the world. It isn't a heritage breed by farmers. It was concocted by a single man: Max Emil von Stephanitz, a landowning Bavarian nobleman and a calvary captain in the Prussian army at the time of the First World War. The turn of the century has quaint practices not seen today. One of them is the Prussian top-down way of governing. One of the manifestations of this bureaucracy is the strong desire to consolidate and standardize things. In tailoring, there was a standardization of drafting systems, and a tailoring academy in Berlin was commissioned to create a Unified Drafting System. Von Stephanitz was asked to create a standardised German dog, one which combines the best traits of all dogs and which would be multipurpose, in particular in law enforcement and on the battlefield.

He didn't just deliver the dogs: Like any good vendor, he also delivered the documentation with the dogs.

"Der Deutsche Schaeferhund in Wort und Bild" is a 800-page book written by von Stephanitz that documents the creation of the German Shepherd and which contains almost everything he knows about dogs. It's worth learning German just to read this book.

He collects wolves and dogs from all over Europe. Many contributed their genes in creating this new dog. He also gives very practical advice on every aspect of breeding and keeping dogs. The detail he goes into is amazing. This man knows everything about dogs.

Download it here
https://archive.org/...eutschesc00step

#304 kotmj

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 02:34 AM

steve-jobs-biography-by-walter-isaacson.

I'm reading Steve Jobs by Walther Isaacson, his official biography. It gives the best insight ever into Jobs. He is a man obsessed with perfection, a tyrant, and the worst sufferer of fools you will ever meet, worse even than me.


More insight into Jobs. I thought he was spiritually more advanced than me when I read his biography two years ago. After all, he's vegan for most of his life, ate often at the Hare Krishnan temple, went on a pilgrimage to India, and keeps quoting Bob Dylan.

Well, now I know he's on a very, very low level spiritually. I was thinking today how it was possible for him to have associated himself so much with Eastern spirituality and have achieved nothing in that department. Till the very end of his life, he's the typical unconscious fool wallowing in samara and dukka that the Buddhists talk about all the time. Not even srotapanna level.

Coarse, egomaniacal psychopath. Not an ounce of spiritual awakening in him.

#305 Zarium

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 02:23 AM

Jobs was a fucking idiot. Amongst other things, he believed in homeopathy. That itself; to me, is enough to be regarded as a fucking moron.

 

Jeremy, you seem like someone who would benefit from psychedelics.



#306 kotmj

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 12:02 AM

You know of a supplier?

Jobs was really an unconscious being. There never was any hope for him.

The other person who is like Jobs -- doing all the spiritual stuff yet totally missing the point of it all -- is Elizabeth Gilbert of "Eat, Pray, Love".

#307 Zarium

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 06:00 AM

You need only ask for a menu.

 

It's a publication meant to pander to the masses who are interested in "spiritual awakening." It has to be shallow, stupid and easily relatable -- because the world isn't exactly made up of intelligent people -- with the semblance of containing some sort of a profound revelation.



#308 kotmj

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 01:17 AM

Larry Page, the Steve Jobs of Google
http://www.businessi...4/#.VE0cyJVxnIU

#309 kotmj

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 11:47 PM

Jho Low
http://www.nytimes.c...-york.html?_r=0

#310 joonian

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 08:12 AM

Relevant reading: 

http://www.newyorker...aining-menswear

 

There wasn’t, unfortunately, a clandestine colloquium, but there was “menswear,” a conversation that began online, in the early aughts, largely on Internet forums devoted to men’s fashion. Each forum catered to a slightly different kind of man. On Ask Andy About Clothes, old prepsters—“trads”—talked about sack suits; on Superfuture, kids who wanted to look like Tetsuo, from “Akira,” compared the fades on their Japanese denim. Users on Styleforum obsessed over heritage and craft, discussing labels like Incotex, Brioni, Filson, and Schott, while StyleZeitgeist was more avant-garde, with an emphasis on Rick Owens.
 
In those heady days, debates raged over fundamental questions: whether black suits are ever appropriate at non-funeral events (they’re not), whether stocky guys can pull off the “goth ninja” look (undecided), and whether jeans should “stack” at the hem or get cuffed (I prefer stacks). All of the “fora” had online marketplaces where men from around the world bought and sold clothes, and, slowly, a consensus emerged about the “grail” items each kind of man must own: Alden cordovan wingtips to go with your multipocked Engineered Garments “Bedford” blazer; flannel shirts from the Japanese brand Flat Head to wear with your Iron Heart or Sugar Cane denim; ties from Drake’s, sport coats from Isaia; a Rick Owens “Exploder” jacket paired with boots from Guidi. Back then, menswear was slightly underground. You would recognize fellow travellers on the street, but not often.
 
 
Around 2010, however, a number of factors combined to make menswear suddenly mainstream. More men started writing menswear blogs, while Tumblr created a menswear tag—“#menswear”—which allowed fashionable people who had missed out on menswear culture to discover it. At the same time, big fashion retailers began selling menswear style. Most prominently, J. Crew began to feature “grail” items in its stores, as part of a program it called “In Good Company.” (Nick Paumgarten’s 2010 profile of the company’s C.E.O., Mickey Drexler, finds him in Maine, sourcing moccasins from Quoddy.) One by one, the strands of men’s fashion emphasized by menswear—heritage Americana, denim fetishism, Ivy League traditionalism, Italian style, with its “sprezzatura,” or relaxed, studied flair—became popularized. Even the “goth ninja” look has achieved some currency, thanks to Kanye, who has made it his own. Today, on any given city block, you’ll see a man whose outfit contains a hint of menswear: a Filson bag; a narrow, high trouser hem; suede shoes with colored laces; a trim blazer in Italian azure; a waxed jacket or indigo shirt with an ironically large number of pockets. You’ll also see men who are desperate to keep their edge; they’re “dressed by the internet,” in crowded ensembles that are designed to be reblogged.





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