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Zinzan

Black tie attire

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Very nice Jeremy, looks a bit like the Poole DJ oft bandied about.

 

Why the decision to go with satin over grosgrain?

 

At least you managed to find 4 carnations. I once went hunting all across London for a carmation to no avail. Finally found a single one at the Claridges florist. They were so surprised people (well me) still wore boutonnieres that they gave it to me.

 

Apparently carnations are really cheap and not worthwhile for florists to grow.

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I like the boldness of the text. If I may comment, though, the ultra-sheen-ness of the left lapel (on the reader's right) makes it look thin and synthetic. I like the lighting of the contralateral lapel.

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I'm curious - why two columns of text, and not, say, a center-aligned one?

 

I don't think it's necessary to mention the pants if they aren't gonna be in the shot...

 

Two columns is the right format. Just one makes for a very wide column. The width of the ad is half the page of a broadsheet newspaper.

 

Very nice Jeremy, looks a bit like the Poole DJ oft bandied about.

 

Why the decision to go with satin over grosgrain?

 

At least you managed to find 4 carnations. I once went hunting all across London for a carmation to no avail. Finally found a single one at the Claridges florist. They were so surprised people (well me) still wore boutonnieres that they gave it to me.

 

Apparently carnations are really cheap and not worthwhile for florists to grow.

Satin for the bling bling. This is a display jacket for the shop window. Satin is ubiquitous. For a reason. People like it.

 

Carnations are indeed cheap. They sold me mine for RM2.50. Not everybody likes a flower in the lapel though.

 

I like the boldness of the text. If I may comment, though, the ultra-sheen-ness of the left lapel (on the reader's right) makes it look thin and synthetic. I like the lighting of the contralateral lapel.

I had to direct the moonlight in such a way as to bring out the sheen of the picture right lapel. It's a feature, not a bug. You will notice though that there's a colour cast -- reddish on picture right. Solving the colour cast problem requires some investment in my moonlight amplification apparatus (more of time than of money).

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The color cast is almost impossible to digitally work with without ruining the true color of the fabrics. Here I tried the lapels only.

 

tuxj.jpg

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I suppose you corrected the hue in the highlights of a masked area? I really should do something about this.

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Here, I rewrote it a little. Not much else I can contribute, unfortunately.

 

 

Under lit chandeliers, some dinner jackets come to life. Some don't.

 

The difference? The fabric. Ours are made in Italy of wool-mohair barathea. Fabric woven for just one reason: To be made into dinner jackets; lustrous and sleek and opulent dinner jackets in the ambiance of ballrooms.

 

The liquid-blackness uniformity is offset by the high-key sheen of the satin lapels.

 

At WhiteCollar, we outfit gents with a comprehensive black-tie ensemble. Bowties, cummerbunds, evening shirts, studs, pocket squares and patent shoes -- all under and around a bespoke Jeremy Tok dinner suit.

 

Black tie. Done right.

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I suppose you corrected the hue in the highlights of a masked area? I really should do something about this.

 

I desaturated the lapels, then added some blue under colour balance.

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I got lucky with the square. Sometimes it turns out like shit. Just stuff it in with the corners facing upwards.

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I love the pocket square fold....how does one achieve that?

 

 

For different squares and also tie knots I found this booklet invaluable, pound for pound the best value I've ever spent on clothing related matters:

Tying the Knot: The Sharp Dresser's Guide to Ties and Handkerchiefs [Paperback]

 

Andrew G. Cochran

 

http://www.amazon.co...=tying+the+knot

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Had my fitting for my true midnight blue dinner suit when I got back to London a couple of days ago. It's coming out very well, and I like the shawl lapels that are in midnight blue grosgrain. I also had my first ever fitting for a butterfly style bow tie (LOL!) in matching midnight blue grosgrain-- we adjusted it a little so it's smaller.

 

Every minute spent waiting for my dinner suit is total misery.

 

Which also brings me to my next headache -- I have 9 new suits on 9 heavy solid wooden suit hangers and I have to figure out how to bring them back to Asia.

 

3422720_zps98c416e0.jpg

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Had my fitting for my true midnight blue dinner suit when I got back to London a couple of days ago. It's coming out very well, and I like the shawl lapels that are in midnight blue grosgrain.

 

What cloth did you go for? Is it a wool/mohair mix?

 

 

Which also brings me to my next headache -- I have 9 new suits on 9 heavy solid wooden suit hangers and I have to figure out how to bring them back to Asia.

 

Is there a freight option for heavy stuff like that, like a specialist movers?

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What cloth did you go for? Is it a wool/mohair mix?

 

Is there a freight option for heavy stuff like that, like a specialist movers?

 

 

I used Smith's mohair-wool mix in a barathea weave (10 oz). It's a true midnight blue, that is, literally, black. it's probably the same one that Manton used on his, and this particular cloth came highly recommended by quite a number of tailors on the Row.

 

I also opted to have my dinner suit 1/4 lined in a sensuous (lipstick red) silk with floral designs woven into them, redolent of silk from a cheongsam (ceremonial dress) from Shanghai's golden epoch, with a cigar pocket to boot.

 

The colour red, was, naturally, a carefully considered choice. This article -- link here -- will explain why I chose red for my lining. Now, all the more reason to look for opportunities to let that subtle hint of red flash out ;)

 

MaggieCheung_InTheMoodForLove-eqsue_08_zpsa772faad.jpg

 

Are tailors in Ireland used to making black tie rigs? Do you prefer peak lapels or shawl collars?

 

There might be specialist movers. But it's probably not going to be cheap. Sighs.

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I used Smith's mohair-wool mix in a barathea weave (10 oz). It's a true midnight blue, that is, literally, black. it's probably the same one that Manton used on his, and this particular cloth came highly recommended by quite a number of tailors on the Row.

 

I also opted to have my dinner suit 1/4 lined in a sensuous (lipstick red) silk with floral designs woven into them, redolent of silk from a cheongsam (ceremonial dress) from Shanghai's golden epoch, with a cigar pocket to boot.

 

Thanks for letting me know the name of that dress, I've always liked them on women. The start of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom has a few great examples which probably explains my liking of them.

 

Are tailors in Ireland used to making black tie rigs? Do you prefer peak lapels or shawl collars?

 

There might be specialist movers. But it's probably not going to be cheap. Sighs.

 

I haven't had an evening rig made as yet although I've one planned, I was thinking a velvet jacket with a cord/rope trim and shawl lapel like so: smoking-jacket-crimson-velvet-shawl-collar-piping.jpg

 

Anyone got any idea where I could get trimmings or cord for a jacket like this? I can't find any for love nor money.

 

Sendmybag.com will send 30kg to Malaysia for £176 which may be of interest for you,

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