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kotmj

The suiting thread

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On 16 July 2018 at 5:48 PM, kotmj said:

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We shot a series in this Bahnhof/Gare, but the lighting conditions were such that, I didn't really know how to handle them. I will be sneding some from this series to an editor in Hyderabad to see if he can make them usable.

I really like your peacoat J (as well as peacoats in general)! I think part of the allure is the classic DB/military silhouette that echoes heroic uniforms of yore. My main gripe with it is that it has to be cut close, so fitted over a shirt or thin sweater. And when you go into modern overheated buildings, you have to take off the peacoat and all you're left with is the shirt or sweater underneath, unlike say a DB blazer which is meant to be worn indoors and can be worn underneath an even grander DB overcoat/greatcoat.


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Quick phone pic of my Carlo Barbera suit jacket in the coatmaker's house. I plan to wear this on Monday when I interview H&S in my shop.

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Drafted by Part Timer B (while I looked over his shoulder), then perfunctorily fitted by the coatmaker (which means almost no fitting since coatmakers cannot fit anything to save their lives).

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Interviewed Mark Graham of H&S. He's Shanghai-based, so naturally I asked him how are the Chinese tailors? But I am disallowed to tell you his reply.

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On 8/23/2018 at 11:55 PM, monsieurxu said:

I really like your peacoat J (as well as peacoats in general)! I think part of the allure is the classic DB/military silhouette that echoes heroic uniforms of yore. My main gripe with it is that it has to be cut close, so fitted over a shirt or thin sweater. And when you go into modern overheated buildings, you have to take off the peacoat and all you're left with is the shirt or sweater underneath, unlike say a DB blazer which is meant to be worn indoors and can be worn underneath an even grander DB overcoat/greatcoat.

The peacoat with a light sweater or flannel shirt occupies a different niche from a DB/overcoat combo. It is more casual. It does have an on/off effect, i.e. insulation, or no insulation, but that is not too different from a leather bomber jacket that my uni housemate of 6 years used to wear. It works great particularly as a "hops from home" sort of garment: when you go out to get some groceries, get a book from the library, or just when attending seminars in the well-heated rooms on campus. However, I'd probably like a sweater too for lectures in big auditoriums which never get particularly warm.

And of course, the role of a "cold weather expedition garment" is played very well by a peacoat. The expeditions don't have to be very far. Going to town for the Sunday market is one such expedition. A DB/overcoat combo is not ideal for such an application.

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I'm 60% sure Syafiq Kyle lives in the Colonial Loft. Twice, I see some coming out of the lift dressed the way a celebrity would and looking very much like him.

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On 28 August 2018 at 4:31 PM, kotmj said:

The peacoat with a light sweater or flannel shirt occupies a different niche from a DB/overcoat combo. It is more casual. It does have an on/off effect, i.e. insulation, or no insulation, but that is not too different from a leather bomber jacket that my uni housemate of 6 years used to wear. It works great particularly as a "hops from home" sort of garment: when you go out to get some groceries, get a book from the library, or just when attending seminars in the well-heated rooms on campus. However, I'd probably like a sweater too for lectures in big auditoriums which never get particularly warm.

And of course, the role of a "cold weather expedition garment" is played very well by a peacoat. The expeditions don't have to be very far. Going to town for the Sunday market is one such expedition. A DB/overcoat combo is not ideal for such an application.

True, although a navy blazer could arguably work for the latter situation and look just as good. Plus it can be worn indoors (can as in it looks right - there's of course nothing stopping you from keeping your peacoat worn indoors although that's a rather HK look).

When I was in uni, my "hops from home" garment was played by a barbour. Seems to be the thing in the UK, with a gilet added when extra cold.

I think the main issue I have with a peacoat versus a blazer is the former should be taken off indoors, exposing a sweater or shirt, which doesn't look quite as put together as a blazer over a sweater or shirt

 

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Blogging on Style & Menswear -
http://avantistilo.blogspot.com

Handmade bespoke watches -
http://maisonceladon.com
http://maisonceladon.tumblr.com/

 

 

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New dispatch boy + part timer. This brings the number of dispatch boys back up to two. ^This is his WhatsApp profile pic; I find it very sympathetic to the business.

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As you can see, has a strong need to stand out. Civil engineering student at UM.

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My latest suit in Carlo Barbera Riserva 1911. As most of you know, for myself I prefer a rather roomy cut with moderate waisting.

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In general appearance, it's not that different from what, say, Brioni would aim for. When there is less ease than what you see here, a jacket ceases to perform normally. I'm very happy with the neck fit and shoulders.

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First suit in Huberross Nevada, a super high twist cloth. 10 oz. It's for a Malaysian working as a civil servant in Singapore. Interestingly, he went to the same secondary school as I did in Kuantan. Civil engineer.

The double breasted vest was made for a different customer.

I'm starting to have new observations about these very high twist cloths which I may write about.

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I think I follow no more than two or three tailors on IG, and a post by one of them came up on my feed. I almost fell off the stairs.

You see what is a densely machine sewn canvas. Wow. I thought this would not be done by them. This is very prevalent especially in Asia. Every HK tailor whose canvas I have seen does it. Practically every Malaysian tailor does it as a matter of course---they're surprised anybody would hand sew the various canvas pieces together. They don't know it's even a possibility.

If they want to work for me, I tell them it's not only a possibility, it is compulsory. Or I fire them.

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The other issue I have with the video above is the type of chest canvas. Unless I'm very mistaken ( I don't think I am, I've been doing this quite a while now), it is THE CHEAPEST chest canvas money can buy. There must be one huge factory in China that churns them out in huge quantity. Because everyone in KL uses exactly that chest canvas, from RM600/suit uniform jackets for hotel staff to five-figure fully canvassed jackets by my competitors. They all use that exact type of chest canvas. Why? Because it's the cheapest, and it even sort of works.

I have many issues with that type of chest canvas. I will spare you the list. It sort of works, but not quite. It works the way one of these cheap collapsible fly fishing rods advertised on American TV shows would work. People who are serious about fly fishing don't use them.

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I have another issue with the video!

I've never seen anybody pad stitch a lapel like that. He either knows something the rest of the world doesn't, or he's the ignorant one.

The rest of the world pad stitches the lapel in order to program the lapel to fold over, and after the fold, to curl backwards. To achieve this, the coatmaker holds the lapel in either a folded or curled position, then affixes this shape with pad stitching. This is very common knowledge. Even otherwise retarded KL coatmakers know this. The technique is best seen here, from 3:30 minutes onwards. Notice how, even after a single column of pad stitching at the lapel crease line, the lapel displayed a marked tendency to fold over.

That Korean coatmaker was pad stitching the lapel with the lapel completely flat! Arhhhhh! Is that for real? I'd have fired that guy within 30 seconds.

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On 9/15/2018 at 12:32 PM, kotmj said:

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Huberross Nevada. Bony, bumpy shoulders. Shirt in The Embassy St. Tropez (a zephyr).

This is why you dont skip leg day at the gym

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