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The suiting thread

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In the foreground is Aali, a UM Economics student who is my part time dispatch boy and general shop assistant. 

I'm figuring out a way to dispose of the sofa. 

I also just bought the lens whose box is on the oak table, the highly esteemed Voigtlander 40mm f1.2 in Sony E mount. 

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I'm making the editor of the above movie a velvet jacket ensemble for the red carpet premiere of the movie. He was once involved with the visual effects of Life of Pi. 

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What's in the wooden box at the base of the stairs? A sewing machine? Form factor reminds me of the bone densitometer in "The Pursuit of Happiness".

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http://theconversation.com/leds-could-be-harmful-to-health-the-eu-halogen-ban-will-make-it-worse-102589

What an illuminating article. By Professor of Psychology, University of Essex, so this is not a quack who wrote it. I completely identify with the effects of magnetic ballast driven flourescents, and whenever I am in the lighting department of IKEA, all the LEDs there give me eyestrain.

At home, I use incandescent bulbs. At the cutting table, too.

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On 8/19/2019 at 12:14 PM, carbman said:

What's in the wooden box at the base of the stairs? A sewing machine? Form factor reminds me of the bone densitometer in "The Pursuit of Happiness".

Yeah, a sewing machine!

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How does a great architect build his own office? He builds it for the sense of well being of the occupants, instead of trying to impress visitors, or to appear "professional". 

You see lots of wood, foliage, and sunlight. 

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https://www.ledsmagazine.com/leds-ssl-design/driver-ics/article/16695240/proper-driver-design-eliminates-led-light-strobe-flicker-magazine

What a flawed paper. It makes the false statement that flickers above 160 Hz are undetectable and cause no health issues. 

The problem occurs during eye movements called saccades. We execute thousands such eye movements throughout a day. 

"Saccades are rapid, ballistic movements of the eyes that abruptly change the point of fixation. They range in amplitude from the small movements made while reading, for example, to the much larger movements made while gazing around a room." 

The stroboscopic effect during a saccade only disappears if the light has a flicker above 3000 Hz. Which few lamps are designed for. 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/theconversation.com/amp/the-scientific-reason-you-dont-like-led-bulbs-and-the-simple-way-to-fix-them-81639

Flicker is only one problem of fluorescent and LED lamps. You have the other problem: blue light. Some LEDs emit a massive proportion in the blue end of the light spectrum. This causes a distortion of your circadian rhythm and hormonal changes. 

Then there is the third problem. The light output of these man made luminaires have frequency gaps, i. e. some portions of the spectrum are underrepresented. The light is just artificial and totally not like sunlight. 

An analogy is infant formula vs breastmilk. Artificial light vs sunlight is like that. 

So, design the space you spend time in such that you can work and live with sunlight alone when sunlight is available. After dusk, use a filament light. 

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The-power-spectra-of-the-standard-sunlig

You see here the wavelength profiles of sunlight, a white Led light, and fluorescent light. Superficially, all three appear to be white light. But just look at the components of that light. The fluorescent creates its white light by mixing a very specific red, with a very specific green and a very specific blue. Hence the three peaks. The other wavelengths are almost completely absent. The Led does something similar. 

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/The-power-spectra-of-the-standard-sunlight-AM15-a-white-LED-used-in-this-work-and-a_fig1_320346591

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Today, an acquaintance of mine who teaches Interior Design at a local college wrote to me:

R: Hey Jeremy, how are you doing? 😁 Are you still based at Empire City?

Me: Yes, I am. 

R: Cool, just wanna know if you mind having visitors over at your workplace? I'm teaching Year 1 interior design on Workplace for Artisans, so it'll be great if the students can see an actual tailoring workplace, esp on how materials and equipment are stored, the space needed, workflow, etc.

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Checking the paperwork, this suit was commissioned sometime in Sep 2015. Pardon the egregious photo quality. 4 years on, still fits (barely). 

Made from a blue H.Lesser cloth no longer in production aka. “Kerbaucloth”. 

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DSC00867.jpg?raw=1

New place for the hand sewing station. Shot this around dusk; this place is naturally bright earlier in the day. I need the bamboos to grow faster. JT is egalitarian in that an employee sits on the same sort of chair as a customer.

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I bought a fidget spinner from Daiso and spun it while being illuminated by this watchmakers lamp. The test showed that this lamp is flicker free. 

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"Modern buildings are often shaped with no concern for natural light - they depend almost entirely on artificial light. But buildings which displace natural light as the major source of illumination are not fit places to spend the day." 

---Christopher Alexander 

There are several ways to counter this. This house which used to stand on Chow Kit Road is a great example. 

Pic001.jpg

It was built intentionally narrow despite the surplus of land around it in order to avoid a dark recessed core of an interior. By building narrow, you get a wing of light. In fact, the part of the house that juts out has windows on *three* of its walls. Why so many windows? For the effect the light has on the interior!!

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This is a wisdom almost completely lost today. If you pay people a few thousand ringgit a month, they would actually spend twenty over daytimes a month soaking in flickering, fake fluorescent lights. Instead of natural light. 

I was partly such a lousy employee because I cannot tolerate such stupidity.

rumah-degil-01.jpg

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So this is the soho at Empire Damansara, across the LDP from my shop. Before moving into my space, I had considered and rejected this place. You see why? 

Why wouldn't you have the windows on the long side, instead of the narrow end? 80% of this unit is unusable without artificial lighting even when the sun is raging outside. It is such a bad design. 

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The question was rhetorical. If you put capital efficiency at the top when designing living spaces and bring it to its logical conclusion, we would soon live like broiler chickens. Actually, many already do.

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Empire-City-Colonial-Loft-Petaling-Jaya-

Holy crap. I thought my unit has lots of light. it turns out that some units in the same building have even more windows than mine. If I move out from here, I will move into one of these.

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f2ea470b9578409596f70f78c11a8a8d.jpg

So while most units in my building get two balconies and four windows, if you go for an 05 unit, you get about 30% more floor space and 3 balconies and 6 windows. Nobody told me that. I had to find it out myself. It's great to have this option if I find myself needing more space.

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On IG, I saw a sponsored post by a new tailor in Subang I had never heard of before. The picture in the sponsored post was of an extremely nice jacket, taken by someone who really knows how to take pictures of jackets. I was shocked by the polish of the picture and of the product. Very professional.

But the style of the jacket as well as the style of the photography reminded me of the top Korean tailors. I do not know of any Malaysian tailor on such a level. 

I did a Google reverse image search and found that the picture belongs to Vanni in Seoul. This Subang tailor used Vanni's picture in its advertising. I see at least three pictures from Vanni on its IG and FB. 

The sponsored post says: Suits from RM950!

Anyway, not a real competitor.

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IMG_20190827_153701.jpg?raw=1

Today, someone came for a job interview. As part of the interview, I got my assistant to teach him how to sew buttonholes, and requested that he sew them. He has never done it before. These are the first two he has ever done. 

I told him that some people can't sew them at all. Even when they try really hard. I see the ability to sew buttonholes as an indicator for a lot of other positive qualities in a person. This guy obviously has the ability, so I asked him to stop after the second buttonhole. 

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He brought along something like five jackets which he cut and sewed as part of his fashion design studies. They were very good. 

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