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kotmj

The suiting thread

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Most smartwatches look like toys. And they're relatively fragile. And can become obsolete. Imagine that - an obsolete watch. But what really gets me is the need to charge them.

Either that, or a manual planner. 

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Sometime in the future, smart watches might be self powered by harvesting energy from the movement of the wrist. But even then they require the calendar function to be activated, in order to display the full array of months. 

I mean, I had to give out an appointment this afternoon while having a hair spa. Then, just now, something similar while munching on a sirloin steak (I felt I needed a meat meal today.)

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Discovered today Employee #2 had straight A's in SPM. 

A fashion design intern starts in November with me for two months. She, too, has straight A's in SPM. 

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Bruh....you need this watch.

I am sure as an engineer you would find the engineering behind it quite amazing.

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On 9/30/2019 at 11:06 PM, kotmj said:

A smartphone doesn't work because it is pressed against my ear when I am on the phone negotiating an appointment. 

You could adopt wireless earbuds. B&O make a rather attractive option, considerably better looking than the ubiquitous airpods. 

Or like, speaker. 

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DSC00947.png?raw=1

Random pic from the workshop. I had to stay late today to see a customer at 8pm.

I was shown a larger unit today by a real estate agent, and I think I will be taking it. It's four floors down and has 1300 sqft, compared to the 950 sqft of the current unit. There is extensive water damage to the walls and ceilings from both rainwater splashing on the exterior walls and seeping in, as well as from the previous tenants showering in the toilets. One area Malaysia has to catch up with other countries is the way our buildings are constructed; very little moisture barrier membranes are used. Also, we do not use shower cabins like the rest of the (developed) world; the water is allowed to splash everywhere. The owner is said to agree to "touching up" the unit, but I'm not sure if his idea of the works required tallies with mine.

It does seem that JT is becoming increasingly JTTW (JT Tailoring Workshop, a name inspired by the Renzo Piano Building Workshop). It is becoming less like a showroom and more like a workshop. I've never liked showrooms anyway. So fake. Many tailors like to separate the space which receives the customer from the space occupied by workers. For instance, this is Despos' showroom:

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And this his workshop:

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The workshops of tailors are almost always pretty ghetto. Yet, a customer spends only an hour or two in a showroom, but the workshops are where the workers spend most of their waking hours. Which should be better designed and furnished? I say the workshop. Also, I personally spend a lot of time in the workshop, so I want it to be pleasant. No flickering flourescent lights, plywood working surfaces, greasy sewing machines for me.

By placing the customer in the middle of the workshop, the business proprietor is forced to habilitate the workshop, to make the workshop as pleasant as a showroom.

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4 hours ago, takashi said:

What a great video. You see the harder side of Antonio. The way he said, "No improvisations." 

It's also an older footage, as Qemal left Liverano quite a while back. A customer told me this. I then checked, and see that he mostly makes for Prologue HK now. 

I'm trying to figure out why tailoring establishments do not practise making key personnel partners. The way professional services firms do. If a guy can make rain and can develop the organisation, why not make him partner? The alternative is to have him as a competitor.

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I was in Bangkok during a Liverano trunk show, and I saw that the jackets were so severely pressed that the buttonholes have been pressed completely flat. It was the most overpressed jacket I have seen. I thought then they must have a tailor partner in Bangkok they would ship the garments in advance of a trunk show to, who would then help them re-press the garments into a customer-ready condition. This tailor must be the one doing all that overpressing, I thought. Well now I know it's really the Liverano 8kg iron that was responsible for it.

You should know that there is another school of thought regarding final press. Thomas Mahon, when he visited the factory in India that manufactured his MTM range, kept saying to the workers there to err on underpressing. If it was not sewn right in the first place, he said, pressing won't correct it. He stressed that the final press is a pretty light process that doesn't take very long.

I have both heavily pressed, and also lightly pressed, jackets. I'm not sure which I prefer. They're different; but both produce a perfectly credible product.

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He's saying YOU should not iron a jacket. Because of the skill and specialised equipment needed. You would only f it up. That's what he's saying. 

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53 minutes ago, takashi said:

Why does Antonio say never iron a jacket but yet they are pressing them?

Is ironing not the same as pressing? 

Basically, it's "Don't try this at home. This footage depicts professionals in a controlled environment." 

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Screenshot_20191013_014456_com.amazon.ki

I was reading "The Modern Tailor, Outfitter, and Clothier: Volume 1" originally published 1928 when I saw the picture above. The caption read: "HAWKES & CO., LTD., SAVILE ROW, LONDON, W.1. CUTTING HALL." 

No. 1 Savile Row was occupied by the Royal Geographical Society before being bought by Hawkes & Co. in 1912. The Cutting Hall you see used to be the galleried library of the Society. 

Today, it is the showroom of Gieves & Hawkes. 

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On 10/12/2019 at 12:16 AM, kotmj said:

Basically, it's "Don't try this at home. This footage depicts professionals in a controlled environment." 

I understand the need to 'protect' customers from themselves, or at least from their (lack of) pressing skills. However, I am intrigued with this skill, especially the aspect of somewhat 'shaping' the garment (shrinking and expanding cloth at will), and feel it a shame to not be able to do it myself.

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On 10/16/2019 at 1:04 PM, carbman said:

I understand the need to 'protect' customers from themselves, or at least from their (lack of) pressing skills. However, I am intrigued with this skill, especially the aspect of somewhat 'shaping' the garment (shrinking and expanding cloth at will), and feel it a shame to not be able to do it myself.

Oh, I am sure you can do it quite well if you approach it with some intent and caution. People like us (smart) can do pretty much anything

This morning, I attended the funeral service of my cousin, who made it to 54 years of age. He died of a heart attack in a Jakarta hotel room. About 1.5 years ago, he underwent a heart bypass. I don't feel much of anything. This is another one of those death-through-eating cases. It is also the most common way of dying in the developed world---the arteries are clogged with fat.

It was handled by a bereavement care company called Xiao En. Everything was very polished, very 5-star. I almost cannot ask for a better service or facilities. I thought, ah, I'll see him off in a suit. I was the only one in a suit. I thought it was so much more elegant than what the others were wearing. I think the pendulum of dress style has swung as much as it can to the side of casualness. My relatives showed up at the funeral in croc sandals, shorts and t-shirts. The pendulum can only swing back from here, since I cannot imagine a more casual way of dressing in the most sombre of occasions.

The staff at the center were all in black suits, but they were all very obese, and the suits were very, very tight. And very cheap.

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After I wrote the above, the super real estate agent I wrote about a month back called. He said one of the owners is willing to rent to me, pretty much at the price I said I was willing to pay.

The problem is, just yesterday, I paid one month's deposit for a larger unit within Colonial Loft itself. It is 1300 sqft.

So now, I need to think if I want to move to Empire Damansara, across the LDP from Empire City. I much prefer the environs of Empire Damansara, and customers will find it much easier to navigate. However, the retail unit is only 1000 sq. ft.

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This is the unit in Empire Damansara that is now available to me. It was previously a vape shop, which discontinued operations in 2016.

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It is right above a Hometown Cafe

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The music composer for the upcoming film "The Garden of Evening Mists" has been nominated for Best Music at the Golden Horse Awards in Taipei. So, he came today to have a tux made for the red carpet. This is how even music composers need suits.

The movie is based on a book of the same title. It was written by a Malaysian, Tan Twan Eng. The guys looks and sounds like he works in a bank, say Public Bank, but is deeply creative. In many of the YouTube videos I found of him, he is wearing a suit. So, even writers of novels wear suits.

 

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