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Somebody's given name, I was told (as opposed to surname). The fabric is a Grandi 200x2. It's like embroidering on facial tissue paper.

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My own personal shirt being cut. That's the sleeve you're looking at. DJ Anderson 200's. Having two made for CNY. No time for trousers, which is what I'm really lacking.image_zpsjobxsawm.jpeg

Well, the shirt is ready.

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I can see why people who have gone ultra fine in their shirts don't want to wear the proletarian stuff anymore.

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I just consulted Google on the number of Chinese characters out there and learn that...

 

"Chinese characters number in the tens of thousands, though most of them are minor graphic variants encountered only in historical texts. Studies in China have shown that functional literacy in written Chinese requires a knowledge of between three and four thousand characters."

 

The reason why you can't buy plastic templates for Chinese characters in a bookshop is the same reason why the printing press was not invented in China. Too many characters.

 

Actually... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_printing_in_East_Asia

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2016-02-18%2016.49.28.jpg?raw=1

 

A new shirt for myself. I've had the fabric for maybe 5 years; it was designed by and woven for Tom Ford. It's a much more sophisticated design than I've seen in any bunch -- Tom Ford really runs a great design studio. The composition is an unremarkable 100's twill. There is no pattern matching at the yoke because of my shirtmaker's unfortunate interpretation of my instructions.

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The other shirt I got made for myself is also from a old fabric. This Alumo zephyr with satin stripes I bought maybe 6 years ago from Gerald Shen before he started Vanda. It came from Iris Tailor's stock of old fabrics. Probably 1980's. The color is an unusual pale grey-blue.

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I still have two lengths of Alumo for myself: one a certified West Indies Sea Island cotton, and another a 200x2 Giza. Maybe I'll have them made next. So this year I'll be rocking DJ Anderson 200x2's, Ton Ford, and various assorted Alumos. Yeah. I got, u dun.

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Also, I should get them all embroidered with my Chinese surname but right now there are other priorities.

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It feels like God's gift from heaven, that man may clothe himself in His image, except man then created even more extreme cultivars of cottonplant, and now doth verily exceedeth God...

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Well, someone just went for a shirt in Soktas' Pasha, a 300X2 of obscene fineness. Quite expensive (for a shirt).

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2016-02-29%2013.06.11-1.jpg?raw=1

I just took this picture to send to a customer. It illustrates the difference between spun polyester (left) and filament polyester (right). The spun thread was made like any wool or cotton yarn used to make cloth. The fibers are originally in the form of fluff, which are then spun into thread. The filament thread otoh are spun from continuous fibers -- fibers of infinite length, not fluff. The fibers are spun as they are extruded. Filament thread is stronger and smoother than spun thread, so you can use a finer thread without compromising strength. I actually forgot I have this cone of thread since I bought it 5 years ago.

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^ lol i have to say i love the gant BD collars. have three, but none are oxford cloth, weirdly. I guess it's just harder to find them on the 'bay compared to Brooks or whatever. 

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https://youtu.be/rh50SuOfiJg

Two very good shirts. One is made in Singapore; the other is of unknown provenance but I think the better of the two.

 

The thing about Najib is how easily he makes friends. Mahathir always makes enemies of foreigners.

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IMG_20160630_201433_zpshngaukim.jpg

 

Several years back, I was looking for an alternative to woven labels on shirts and came upon the idea of stamping the shirts I make with ink. I had the stamp made, but never did order the permanent ink to use with the stamp pad. (Why? No idea. Busy with other stuff. You have to import the permanent ink, you can't buy them locally.)

 

For the past couple of years, I have been delivering my shirts without a label of any kind. Which suits most customers, actually. I need to remember this when it comes to jeans.

 

A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with a customer who was very prickly about the topic of labels in shirts. He wanted to know above all else what kind of scratchy, oversized, gaudily designed patch he will have to suffer on the six shirts he ordered from me. I told him my shirts are labeless. He heaved a sigh of relief.

 

I think he will find the solution pictured above quite acceptable.

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I think optimal placement is on the chest. I shall have a new stamp made with my mobile phone number on it specifically for use on the chest.

 

But customers may specify the use of the current stamp on the front bottom of the shirt.

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IMG_20160828_013455_zpstownqeak.jpg

 

All kinds of explanations have been given by various people to explain the benefits of a split yoke on shirts. I do not know the current consensus on the menswear fora on this matter -- I haven't been reading styleforum in years. I remember the conventional wisdom that a split yoke allows for correcting the shoulder slope on one side. Some say it makes the shirt drape better because when split, the yoke is in a bias cut which stretches.

 

The first purported benefit is not really true -- you can correct for assymetrical shoulder slopes without a split yoke. A split yoke doesn't make it easier at all.

 

The second purported benefit has some merit. To understand this, however, requires appreciation for the directional characteristics of cloth. Pick up a piece of cloth with both hands at say 8" apart. Tug at it. Let go, rotate the piece 90 degrees and pick it up again. Tug. You will notice that the cloth is stretchiest at a 45 degree angle to the grain of the cloth. A split yoke exploits this property.

 

But for the bias property to express itself, the yoke, which is made of two layers of cloth, needs to be split on both layers. The majority of split yokes are split on one side only -- the outer side. The inner layer is one contiguous piece. These sort of split yokes are split for cosmetic purposes only. Only the double split yoke -- split outside and inside -- is structurally split.

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