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the old man's choice.... got royal warrant tau!

 

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i only use very little for abit of shine. mebbe i'll try it on some one else's shoes. :P

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the old man's choice.... got royal warrant tau!

 

img2012062200414.jpg

 

i only use very little for abit of shine. mebbe i'll try it on some one else's shoes. :P

You just got into my 'Man's Men List'...inbetween Danial Craig & Liam Neeson.. :D

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I know it's relatively more popular in SE Asia than in Europe, but personally I dislike pomade, brilliantine and the Vaseline type products. My hair is oily enough as it is, and I don't want to give myself contact dermatitis through over use of detergent to wash it all out! Most of these products will transfer onto shirt collars, seat head-rests (thus the introduction of the antimacassar in the 19th century) and bedclothes - thence to your face for some attractive acne!

 

If you have thick hair, as I do, you may have struggled to find an alternative to these greases. One with enough hold, yet didn't dry to a hard varnish.

 

I once picked up a tub of Wella Shockwaves Go Matt Clay and haven't been without it since. Although it might take a bit of getting used to at first, it really is the best thing out there, in my opinion. Neither as heavy as gel nor as hard and sticky as hairspray, easy to style (sets firm, but doesn't go hard), easy to wash out (not at all greasy), and can readily be slipped into an overcoat pocket or shoulder bag to take around with you. It lasts for ages as you only need to apply finger-tip quantities at a time.

 

I've seen other Wella hair products that look intriguing, like their texture gum, but haven't felt any pressing need to dabble with them.

 

Unfortunately, I can't say where you'd pick them up in KL, having never looked for them (I got mine in the UK), but Boots would most likely have them, and maybe Guardian, plus they're sold on Amazon and eBay. Has anyone else here used this? What's your opinion?

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The answer for the guy who likes the shine of pomade, but hates the 'old man smell' and oiliness of the product.

 

Recently stumbled upon this styling mud, which has a really strong hold and imparts a natural shine to your hair. Perfect for people like me who like the slick back style, but has hair as fine as a baby (thus requiring strong holding product). I've found this product washes off very easily with water and does not leave my face greasy at the end of the day like regular pomade.

 

Only gripe is that it smells like peaches initially. Not the most masculine smell in the world.

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I have damn hair as fine as a baby too. Girls want it on themselves, but it's a pain to style and when it isn't styled, looks crappy.

 

Spent quite a bit on cream from Truefitt & Hill (fine if it's good) but the hold is so weak, it's irritating. I should have known that cream without oil wouldn't be as effective.

 

http://www.truefittandhill.co.uk/products/C.A.R-Cream.html

 

I must say that the 'old man' smell takes some getting used to. I used to detest it but I now like the barber shop smell. Evocative of a bygone era, of Victorian England, and masculine. Penhaligon's English Fern is a great scent if one likes a traditional English fragrance.

 

Blenheim Bouquet, as used by Churchill, Clinton, and Prince Charles, is also good but it has a very strong 'arrogant' and peppery feel about it. Dr Harris has also created a few nice scents that are moderately priced.

 

These are all very masculine and old world so nothing like the light CK, DKNY colognes that are de rigeur among the young these days, and a little effeminate if you ask me. Hence, given the distinct scents of these perfumes, ppl either love them or hate them.

 

http://www.drharris.co.uk/colognes/d-r-harris-arlington-cologne

 

http://www.penhaligons.com/shop/fragrance/english-fern-eau-de-toilette-496782.html

 

For smth slightly pricier, try Creed's Royal Oud or English leather. They're both good, but like the top few perfumes (with the exception of DR Harris' Arlington that might be very slightly more common), these have distinct scents as well.

 

Dr Harris perfumes and a couple products by Taylor of Old Bond street are a bang for the buck, however.

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Paul Mitchell tea tree shampoo, very strong mint feeling and strips all the oil from the hair.

 

Dettol mens shower gel, slightly minty, smell fades away after a while. Skin feels very clean and I use it on my face too.

 

Gatsby generic hair clay, not the overpriced Rubber clay series. I don't like hair to be glossy as I have oily hair.

 

Either nivea or tabac shaving products. Thayers witch hazel toner. Nothing branded or expensive.

 

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Creed Aventus.

 

Was repulsed by the initial pineapple note but it soon settled into a plethora of refined, leathery, gets you laid bouquet.

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Cherry wood comb and buffalo horn comb. Traditional Chinese combs, both are highly valued by their oil spreading properties and gentle on hair and scalp.

 

Still waiting for my Kent military brush to slowly ship in from UK.

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The shoe shine service is wrecking my fingers and nails. Basic pedicure set: Clipper, file, cuticle trimmer and cuticle oil.

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I've been recently using Dr Bronner's range of liquid soaps.

 

It can be found in most organic/health food stores. Ingredients are all natural / organic so its supposed to not contain many chemicals which could eff us up (coconut oil/ olive oil etc.)

 

It lathers up like a beauty and I've fallen in love with the peppermint (refreshing!) and almond (luxurious) scents.

 

It also has hokey claims that it has 18 uses including as shampoo and toothpaste. I don't believe these claims, but as a bodysoap - I give it 10 out of 10.

 

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In Melbourne, an 8oz (250g) bottle costs about $13. I saw it in some health food shops for RM39 in Malaysia. 

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6 - dr bronners is solid. used it for a while too. my partner is a skincare fanatic, so luckily for me, have tried a wide range of excellent skincare products. bronners rates. 

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I did not own a dopp kit until recently. The reason has something in common with why Steve Jobs had no furniture in his house for a long time. He couldn't find any he would buy. I observed the dopp kits which presented themselves to my attention, and could not buy any of them.

 

The people who make these things do not understand the product. There are many problems with dopp kits in general:

 

1. They are made of a permeable material.

2. They are not made of a washable material.

3. They are too god damned dark on the inside.

4. They are too god damned heavy. The bag -- made of thick bridle leather or what not or thick waxed canvas or what shit -- weighs more than the contents of the damned bag. Stupid.

5. The exterior of the dopp kit is harmful to the objects around it. For instance, the dopp kit uses a metal-toothed zipper. When a metal-toothed zipper meets a shirt made of 170's superfine cotton, the zipper wins.

6. They are made of a washable material but it takes a week for the bag to dry out. I don't have a week.

 

Bag makers rarely understand that one of the biggest frustrations in using a bag is having to fish inside it. The interiors of bags are shielded from illumination, making them very dark. Try finding a dark object inside a deep bag made of a black material. It's a huge annoyance.

 

Dopp kits also contain bottles of liquids and creams which more often than not tend to leak and ooze. When flying, the bottles are subject to large pressure changes which can force the liquid contents out of the bottles. The dopp kit needs to be impermeable to prevent the liquids from oozing out of the bag onto clothes and gadgets.

 

So about two months ago, I finally saw a dopp kit I can buy. Someone finally understood the function of a dopp kit.

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This Muji dopp kit will contain leaks and prevent them from spreading beyond the kit. It is transparent, making it very easy to locate the exact item you need from within the bag because it is as well-lit within the bag as without. It is also trivially easy to rinse out. The perfect dopp kit, really.

 

I'm just amazed at how dumb dopp kit makers are in general.

 

Less well conceived are Muji's refillable toiletries bottles. I bought a set of them. Two broke when they fell to the floor from a wet ledge in a hotel shower -- I took a closer look at why they broke and found the caps to be ridiculously weak. So I spent some time in a Watson looking for bottles I can repurpose. Lifebuoy hand sanitizer have very robust caps and a pleasing form -- I emptied them of their original contents and filled them with a body wash in one and shampoo in the other.

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The far left and far right are refillable Muji bottles which I will replace once they break.

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All this talk about Dr. Bronners, who I read was a Jewish soap expert from Heilbronn, Germany, an area I am quite familiar with, made me more curious about soaps. It made me buy some soaps to try out.

 

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From top: Pagoda Brand Camphor Soap, 999 Brand Chlorophyll Soap, Sebamed Cleansing Bar

 

The top two are made by the same manufacturer in Johor. These are very basic soap recipes. A fat (coconut oil), lye (sodium hydroxide), and essential oils (camphor, eucalyptus and citronella oils). It's the sort of soap recipe home soap makers would use. The 999 soap has chlorophyll as well. At the bottom is the Sebamed which is not a soap in the strict technical sense; it's a high tech cleanser made in Germany in bar form.

 

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The 999 soaps I find to be a very good soaps. Insects and mosquitoes cannot tolerate the essential oils in it -- I think it was formulated specifically to ward off mosquitoes. I've used the 999 twice to bathe my dog, and since I used it, there have been no ticks or fleas on him -- I don't think they can tolerate the cocktail of camphor, eucalyptus and citronella oils. I also used it on my cat with the same good results. I've been showering with the 999 myself and it's great. The Pagoda soap I just bought today and will be using at the hand basin in the upstairs toilet. They are very economical -- the Pagoda is RM1.30, the 999 is RM1.80. The Sebamed is RM8.

 

I've since learnt it is trivially easy to make your own soap. This video gives an idea of the process.

 

 

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