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terrorsquad

Collateralised debt a.k.a. The Cloth Thread

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When cutting, the intricate scenery in those silk pieces (especially the leftmost and middle ones) post a dilemma. In my mind these pieces can be reworked for women's garments. One example will be similar to what Priscilla Ong Shunmugam http://ongshunmugam.com/ does. For male garments, it will be a challenge. I can see them being part of a smoking jacket or a bathrobe. 

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I was thinking of making the right back pocket of jeans out of them, either wholly or partially as a segment of the pocket patch. But, man. These cloths are so precious and fragile and jewel-like, it's a travesty.

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Still think it is wrong place to use those silk pieces. The seat takes a beating and most men put wallets at the back pocket. All too often...

 

back-pocket-denim-rip-2.jpg

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Can use the silk or kimono to patch the holes in the pockets.

 

Using it replace an entire pocket will probably look gaudy no matter what. Unjean.

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IMG_3412.jpg?raw=1

 

I was flipping through the Piacenza books, preparing myself to meet with a customer who is looking for a linen jacket, when I saw this gorgeous linen-silk herringbone. The thought came to me that the worldwide demand for such a niche cloth must be miniscule, yet there are companies in Italy who take the trouble to develop such nice cloths, produce them, stock them and distribute them.

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I was asked for my feedback on the Holland & Sherry Dragonfly Supreme Super 160's by the distributor, who in turn was asked by H&S. Having delivered my third suit in this cloth today (with another one in the works), I felt it was time to provide my input to the cloth developers at H&S. Here's the email I sent them.

 

"It's a very serviceable cloth; great haptics combined with good tailorability. Customers like the contemporary designs and the super luxe hand feel. I like how the cloth tailors -- not delicate, reasonable crease resistance. A much better cloth than the impossible Dragonfly Lightweight with Aquarette treatment."

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Hi all, long time lurker here. I was thinking of getting a new suit done and came across this material, could I get some opinions on it? 3.4m seems a little shorter than the usual 3.5m, would it be enough for someone about 5' 10" in height? Thanks all

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/100-SUPER-120-s-WOOL-SUITING-FABRIC-Dormeuil-TECNIK-MADE-ENGLAND-3-4-m-/322110643711?hash=item4aff4a5dff#shpCntId

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Seven pieces of jacketing/suiting cloths coming my way from Italy, Scotland and, eh, Singapore. 2X Piacenza 1733 linen, 2X Holland & Sherry South Pacific linen, 1X Guabello, 1X Holland & Sherry Fiesta, 1X Holland & Sherry Mille Miglia. Man, are we busy.

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IMG_20160620_174142_zps4ochk6y2.jpg

 

Seven cuts of cloth. From top clockwise: a "solaro" wool from Piacenza for a jacket, a linen-wool-silk from Piacenza for jacket, H&S Mille Miglia for a suit, two H&S South Pacific linens for Jesus bush jackets, H&S Fiesta for a suit and a Guabello for a suit.

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The first of these, the "solaro" (i.e. two-tone herringbone) from Piacenza is a mistake. The customer wants a Piacenza 8/61. I wrote 8/61 in my order book. Then, I typed 8/61 into Google Keep. Later, I copied and pasted from Google Keep into Gmail and sent the email to the distributor. In gmail, it appeared as 8/6. On the sales order from the distributor, it became 8/06. 8/06 arrived.

 

Somebody please apply the 5-Why analysis and recommend a different process to avoid such a mistake in the future.

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Personally, I would never name cloths as 8/1, 8/2, 8/3, etc. Or 67821/1, 67821/2, etc. Especially in swatch books where the cloths are the size of stamps with about a dozen cloths in a column it is trivially easy to read the wrong code.

 

I would name cloths in a way that make mistakes impossible. So NAV-POW-CFF is a cloth from the "Navigation" bunch, with a prince-of-wales check pattern in a coffee shade. No matter how you write NAV-POW-CFF, it is impossible to make it look like any other cloth manufactured by Piacenza. It becomes truly idiot proof this way. It is also very intuititve -- the handler can glance at the cloth itself and confirm that he is indeed handling a coffee POW.

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If the cloths don't change much, you could name them whatever u want, then have a script transcribe your-given-name to manufacturer's-f-uped-naming-system on the fly. It would also be useful to have a pic in the database confirming the said cloth.

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Yes, something of this sort will need to exist. Material requisition is a very time consuming affair because I need to always check the code in my book against the actual cloth swatch before submitting my order. The cloth books are in my car in the car park, while I'm in the apartment.

 

This is the second time I made a mistake in ordering cloth in my tailoring career. Just had a conversation with the distributor, and his exchange terms were extremely generous (non-punitive). The first time I made a mistake was with Harrison's of Edinburgh, and the local distributor was very kind to arrange an exchange however with a 30% restocking fee and all shipping costs on me. I counted myself lucky they even took the cloth back.

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IMG_20160630_114821_zps3fhrr1qd.jpg

 

The right Piacenza arrived. Love the selvedge.

 

I now have formed a definite opinion on the difference in intention between linens like the Piacenza (but also of other boutique Italian mills) and Irish linens (like the H&S South Pacific). By difference in intention, I mean what the producers were trying to achieve with the linen. They diverge strongly.

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IMG_20160923_231125_zpscfi8lyw7.jpg

 

It's almost a relief not to be making a dark blue or grey suit. A tan suit inspired by what the recent installment of Bond wore while in the desert waiting for the taxi.

 

Canon has difficulty reproducing this shade of brown, so while this is close, it's not that close.

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IMG_20161025_135207_zpsikqek7mp.jpg

 

Suraj came by the shop today for a little chat. Nothing much new from H&S: an updated black tie book and one or two new bunches. We talked about several players in SG like the situation with Kay Jen, and of course shared gossip about various KL tailors. He just left my shop to go meet with Jerrick of Bespoked.

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IMG_20170301_143155_zpstodocuvc.jpg

 

Just received my brand new VBC book. The distributor had been reluctant to replenish stock due to weak demand and unfavorable forex. Stocks became almost nonexistent. But finally they coughed up the capital and we have a big fat book with all the perennial favorites in stock again.

 

IMG_20170301_143232_zpsqxckhad3.jpg

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Hi, total newb trying to get information about clothing here.

I was looking online for some fabrics and stumbled upon the following :

- Harrisons of Edinburgh Mystique

- William Halstead 60% Summer Kid Mohair 40% Super 100 Wool

I've read that mohair tends to be scratchy depending on the percentage of the mohair, but I've never actually felt it in person.

I was wondering which would be more suitable for use in tropical climate such as Malaysia, Indonesia (South east Asia mostly), probably going to use it for outdoors. Which one would you think will be more suitable?

Also, I'm also looking for linings that are breathable and unique (not flashy/tacky unique, more like deep colors such as ultra marine blue, teal, etc). Is there any recommended online shop for suit linings?

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