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Is creasing like this normal? I read somewhere in SF that certain creases or similar ones to these signify a poor fit. However they feel fine when I put them on, snug but not constricting.

 

They are carmina double monks on the inca last. If anyone can chime in, how does the inca last compare to the rain last?

 

I have these shoes but in shell. Don't really like them or the last. Too pointy.

 

They crease the same way for me. Inca is Carmina's widest last and I size down by a full size from my Us size. Rain is an altogether more beautiful last which is gently chiselled and slightly less wide which is why I size down by a half in it from my US size.

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I have these shoes but in shell. Don't really like them or the last. Too pointy.

 

They crease the same way for me. Inca is Carmina's widest last and I size down by a full size from my Us size. Rain is an altogether more beautiful last which is gently chiselled and slightly less wide which is why I size down by a half in it from my US size.

 

Thanks for the info! Very helpful..I'm just slightly concerned that by sizing up half it will affect the length of the shoe too? I have a pair of suede double monks on the Simpson last and sized up by half, they fit fine but look slightly elongated on my feet.

 

Perhaps it's just my height (or lack of it) but they look a little..clownish on me.

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^Court shoes?!

 

LOL.

 

http://www.blacktieguide.com/Classic/Classic_Footwear.htm

http://www.esquire.com/the-side/style-guides/formal-tuxedo-styles#/category1

 

'

Classic Black-Tie Footwear

 

 

 

Whether slip-on or lace-up, the defining characteristic of formal footwear is its aesthetic minimalism. “Small, slim, and narrow feet give a light, quick, and (and hence) young lift to the overall silhouette” explains the black-tie treatise The Aesthetics of the Tuxedo, pointing out that this optical slight-of-hand was often employed by vintage fashion illustrators. Consequently, formal shoes have a distinctly slipper-like appearance.

 

Patent leather was the material of choice for evening shoes from the 1850s through to the 1950s when well-polished calfskin became an acceptable alternative. In both cases the high gloss of the shoe is intended to complement the outfit’s various silk facings as part of black tie’s sophisticated contrast of textures. Just be sure to avoid inexpensive patent PVC (vinyl) footwear as it will not only look cheap but will crack and peel as well.

 

 

Formal Pump (Court Shoe)

 

 

The formal pump (also known as an opera pump or, in the UK, men's court shoe) has its origin in eighteenth century court dress and has changed very little in the ensuing three hundred years. A vestige of an era of more effete men’s wear – it was originally worn with knee breeches and silk stockings – it is often misunderstood by more macho contemporary dressers. However, sartorial connoisseurs continue to appreciate its club elegance and the aristocratic nature of footwear intended to be worn exclusively indoors.

 

The evening pump is decorated with a silk bow, either pinched or flat, that complements the overall outfit in a couple of ways according to The Aesthetics of the Tuxedo. First, it coordinates with the necktie to bookend the suit and, secondly, it tricks the eye into seeing a smaller vamp (the upper portion of the shoe where the bow sits) thus enhancing the illusion of a smaller foot. While it would stand to reason that the bow should be satin or grosgrain to coordinate with the rest of the outfit’s facings, it is almost always grosgrain. This is because the high gloss of the shoe’s leather already complements the luster of the facings and so the bow fabric is utilized to offset the pump’s sheen rather than overdo it.

 

Pumps have traditionally been associated with dancing which is why they are often quilted for additional comfort. However their slight build and lack of ties require that they fit the foot perfectly in order not to slip at the heel.

 

 

Formal Lace-Up (Oxford)

 

 

Although not as formal as the pump, the evening lace-up still boasts an impressive heritage dating back to the turn of the twentieth century. The low-cut oxford derives its elegance from its “closely cropped soles, delicately beveled waist, and glovelike fit” as Dressing the Man so poetically explains. In addition, the ready-to-wear version has an advantage over its slip-on counterpart because of its ability to fit a wider variety of foot shapes and subsequent reduced likelihood of pinching or slipping while dancing.

 

Laced shoes must be as basic as possible in order to respect formalwear’s refined minimalism. Plain-toe models are best due to the absence of decoration. Of the two types of oxfords, the closed-laced balmoral (considered the only true oxford by the British and by American traditionalists) is considered more formal than the open-laced blucher (derby in UK) because of its shapelier silhouette. Conversely, wingtips and brogues should be avoided as they are too similar to daily work shoes and loafers are also much too casual. '

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Thanks for the info! Very helpful..I'm just slightly concerned that by sizing up half it will affect the length of the shoe too? I have a pair of suede double monks on the Simpson last and sized up by half, they fit fine but look slightly elongated on my feet.

 

Perhaps it's just my height (or lack of it) but they look a little..clownish on me.

 

Actually they look fine on your foot to me.

 

I have got Rain Last shoes on both 8 and 8.5. The differences in length are not at all noticeable for my feet or to the eye. The 8 is a single monk that pinches my little toe after a few hours and becomes annoying. The 8.5 is perfect and shows no sign of heel slippage. For one of my 8.5 pairs (a whole cut ) I use a slim shoe insert that makes it perfect. But feet are an imprecise science so your results may be different.

 

I am expecting a pair of Uetam last loafers...for these too I downsized by a half to 8.5....let us see how that goes.

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Ol' blue eyes shoes make him look like a poofter.

 

Whatever floats your boat. I'm too lazy to argue with somebody who probably isn't even in the least in tune with the proper etiquette/tradition of black tie and who wishes to dispense opinions on what ought or not to be the appropriate attire.

 

You can well choose to wear your Vass and purple Girling shoes with a tuxedo if it pleases you.

 

After all, in this case, it might well be the shoes that separate the initiated from the amateur.

 

For the record: There's a reason why black tie dress is different from everyday wear. It's MEANT TO BE a costume of sorts where clothing is sufficiently different from business wear, and if you can't appreciate the context and tradition and deliberate difference, well, what can I say?

 

You don't find these features on day-to-day wear: Dress shirts typically come with a marcella front (or pleats) and are anchored by shirt studs, coats come with satin/grosgrain lapels and cloth covered buttons, and with satin/grosgrain ribbons running down the side of the trousers, with a boutonniere also. Even the weave of the fabric is different.

 

So if you're speaking the language of everyday dress, and fail to appreciate convention and context, classic dinner dress and its elegance is a language that's going to be lost on you. So to even try and argue with you is, idiomatically speaking, akin to casting pearls before the swine.

 

BTW: What do you think about Malay men wearing sarongs?

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*Also tangentially related:

 

’… rules of propriety have always been a proxy for class in a very particular way. That is, a prole seeking to imitate “court” dress, in vox’s phrase, would have a hard time because he’d never be able to keep his [court shoes] clean. Likewise, the various gradations help to weed out the pretenders precisely by making it hard (or expensive) for him to dress strictly correctly for every given occasion. He will compromise, and so show that he lacks the means to maintain a truly suitable wardrobe.

 

Formality also rises with the difficulty of maintaining the garment for a related reason—its very difficulty helps separate the wheat from the chaff. Clothes that make concessions to practicality reveal the need on the part of the wearer to make such concessions ...'

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EdEtAlcustomcordovanbootsHorween8_zps61ebc12f.jpg

 

Ed Et Al dress boots in Horween #8. Although you can't see them, they have rubber soles similar to Dainite soles. I am very impressed with the fact that Ed Et Al took only 5 weeks to deliver the shoes when they told me it would take 6-8 weeks. Edwin also warned me that they would be stiff and so I expected them to be uncomfortable. I am glad to report that they were very comfortable to wear. Also, I asked for speedhooks, which makes putting them on and taking them off a breeze. Needless to say, I'm very pleased with these boots, and I look forward to ordering from them again.

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Until they post a pic of themselves in it on this forum accompanied by a pompous, floral description, I will reserve comment.

 

Err. You know how to search for Google images, right? Or do you mean to say you've never seen Malay men in sarongs? And if so, are you refraining from commenting because you're not versed in this matter and have never seen Malay men in sarongs? Or for other reasons -- such as you realise the importance of context, history, and tradition in this specific instance?

 

And what on earth is 'floral description' and how is describing a flower pompous? Also, why is describing a flower pertinent to sarongs and Malay men?

 

You really do have to be more lucid than that. Sorry.

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