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kotmj
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Left a question in the watch appreciation section. How much will you pay for a preowned Patek P Gondolo which does not come with box and papers? 30% of retail price?? Less??

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Interesting article from the Star:

http://rage.com.my/content/stories/dress-code-the-biting-myth/

 

Quote:

[Come on, you’ve heard that myth before, right? Many people will tell you this – bite your shoes first before they bite you. :blink: It’s an Asian myth, according to some online. Either we Asians have a really good sense of humour, or we really are geniuses.

I was reluctant at first, but I realised I had nothing to lose (except a bit of dignity if seen doing it). It wouldn’t kill me and my toes were looking rather miserable, so what the heck? I bit. It worked. No blisters. Very odd.

I decided to ask my friends by posting a Facebook question about this myth. To my delight, about 90% :o of those who replied believe it and they, too, bite their shoes behind closed doors. Some hammer them. Some even apologise to the shoes and caress them before they bite with guilt.]

 

Is this practice kerbau-sanctioned? B)

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An outrageous conclusion to infer that her not getting blisters was solely attributed to her taking a bite of her shoe.

 

Its like concluding "I didn't have a headache today, must be because <Insert random inane activity here> e.g. drank orange juice, jumped up and down 10 times, held my breath for 30 seconds, it worked!"

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...for shoes Made in Vietnam, you are going all precious?

 

I'm curious how much of an effect the country in which a pair of shoes are made have on their quality. So far, I've been assessing the quality of shoes with little regard for their provenance. My pair of Herrings cost me about S$100 more than my pair of Ed Et Als. The Herrings were stated to have been made in the EU, but they aren't noticeably better than the ones made in Vietnam. I can understand if the process for creating the product in question requires the utilisation of geographically exclusive means of production (eg certain sources of water in Scotland are vital in the production of scotch whiskey) but that does not occur to me to be the case with shoes. That being said, I would be grateful for any instruction on this matter that may be provided.

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In my opinion, the quality control is more important than the product's provenance. In most cases, plenty of "Made in China" goods are fine - it's just that erroneous negative connotation that has been around for ages.

 

It really differs from product to product though, like you say. Scotch is one instance. Another is my personal experience with some BMW cars - my E36 320i is a complete built up unit - assembled in Germany, shipped as a piece whole here. The E46 318i was assembled here.

 

The E36 is >5 years older than the E46. The only repair it required in the past 5 years were the locks/actuators in the doors. The E46 has had oil leakage, random parts in the interior falling apart, et al.

 

So even quality control varies considerably from region to region, despite being under the same name.

 

Then again this is for cars - shoes are not so complicated.

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How does one remove the spit-shine from the toes of a shoe? I tried searching on Google, but there weren't any results. I'm just wondering if it's difficult, because I may want to opt for non-spit shined shoes in the future.

 

Good'ol Saphir renovateur has solvants in it as well.

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How does one remove the spit-shine from the toes of a shoe? I tried searching on Google, but there weren't any results. I'm just wondering if it's difficult, because I may want to opt for non-spit shined shoes in the future.

 

Shoe Snob recommends nail polish remover: http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/p/polish-your-shoes-properly.html?m=0 I've been using that. Hopefully it's not too harsh.

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Any idea where I can get the renovateur? eBay's chelseashoerepairshop doesn't seem to have any listed, and most sites I can remember (Kirby Allison's etc) are overpriced. I don't think PLal has any left either.

 

a fine pair of shoes? or Valmour. get zinzan to do another group purchase. hohoho

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In my opinion, the quality control is more important than the product's provenance. In most cases, plenty of "Made in China" goods are fine - it's just that erroneous negative connotation that has been around for ages.

 

It really differs from product to product though, like you say. Scotch is one instance. Another is my personal experience with some BMW cars - my E36 320i is a complete built up unit - assembled in Germany, shipped as a piece whole here. The E46 318i was assembled here.

 

The E36 is >5 years older than the E46. The only repair it required in the past 5 years were the locks/actuators in the doors. The E46 has had oil leakage, random parts in the interior falling apart, et al.

 

So even quality control varies considerably from region to region, despite being under the same name.

 

Then again this is for cars - shoes are not so complicated.

It's always interesting for someone like me to hear how people describe the quality of their things. Making things is what I have been engaged in the more than a decade being trained to design things mechanical (my Masters degree), and later to learn how to manage teams of designers (as the intern of one of the Airbus A380's project managers), two thesis on supply chain management and later two jobs as an operations project manager in factories. I think I have worked in maybe 8 production plants: one is a Tier 1 automotive supplier of fuel tank systems where I spent 3 semester breaks helping the GM, two plants which makes agricultural machinery (combine harvesters, etc.), one civilian aircraft manufacturer, one Japanese machine tool maker, one cigarette machine maker, etc.

 

It's not QC. Quality as defined by conformance to specifications does not come about through QC. Quality begins very early, right from the design stage where you select technologies that are mature, where you find robust design concepts.

 

That's one way to look at quality, as conformance to specification. This will not be perceived by the customer as "quality" if the thing does not have high product specification. So the other way to look at quality is level of specification. You can make crap with high conformity, or you can make a very convincing design with high conformity.

 

Toyotas have high conformity, but are not perceived to be as high quality as a Lexus. The difference is not QC, it is product specification.

 

And then there is the mystical component of quality. A plant where the workers have spent many years in their jobs, supported by engineers who care, and ruled by enlightened management will produce better quality than a plant where the workers hate their jobs, the engineers are constantly searching for their next gigs, and the managers find details cumbersome.

 

Quality, and how to produce products imbued with it, is a fascinating subject that is actually quite vast. It touches on everything -- from idiot-proof production jigs to design-for-quality to worker motivation.

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Someone's been a really bad boy.

 

 

img0590v.jpg

 

 

Like, really really bad boy.

 

 

img0591rs.jpg

 

I thought a few weeks ago, you were crying about having a student budget. But if this is what student budget can buy, I shuddered to think what is your version of a employment budget. :P

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Ok, people. I dont know if this deserves its own thread, I'll let kotmj make that call.

 

 

Fit

 

As I have previously mentioned,fit is very tricky with Vass. I took a gamble and it paid off. I wear a size UK8 for C&J's but for Vass, I went for 41.5 in the F-last and it fits me perfectly. The consensus is that you need to size up a half size for the U-last. i will give this theory a try for my next order.

 

If you are unsure, its best advised you go through Kolecho. Some forum members I know are in my size so I am more then happy to let them try my pair to assist them in sizing up.

 

 

Hi TS

 

I've been dealing with Reszo to put together an order and he really is a top guy.

 

Can I check something on Vass sizing with you?

 

I usually wear a US9D, UK8F (both of which are regular widths) with no complaints.... and UK8.5E (C&J Harvard unlined shell loafer).

 

Recently got a Carmina Wholecut on Rain Last (Chiselled semi square shape) in UK8.5 for a nice comfy fit with laces and a Oscar Last Derby (same width but rounded toe) in Size 8 for a nice fit too. I also got the Rain Last single monk in UK 8 and that is pretty snug as most monks should be.

 

Bearing this in mind, what would you suggest I go for in Vass F-Last and P2 Last.....my gut (and Reszo) says EUR42. But I noted how you said you sized down by half. I have to get this spot on as I am sure returning these or selling them for a loss is not an option.

 

My foot measures 26.5cm (L) and around 9.5/9.7cm (W-- when I don't lay it flat on the floor and put my weight on it). FWIW, I have never worn anything below 42 ever.

 

Many Thanks

 

Fiddler

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