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kotmj

The suiting thread

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Yes.

The hand sewing station received a major ergonomic upgrade today.

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Instead of the working surface at desk height (70cm), it has now been raised to bench height (90cm). This reduces fatigue from having to stoop over your work, or from having to bring the workpiece with your hands up to your eye. This makes the station even more like a watchmaker's bench.

Something she made today:

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So, this is it. The idea I had last night turned into flesh today. Almost all buttonholes are terminated by a tack of some sort; either a simple loop tack, or a more elaborate bar tack. Here, you see an embroidered triangular tack at the end of each buttonhole. I have never seen this done anywhere. It is 100% an original idea.

Going forward, I might have the triangle done in a different colour for a small colour accent. Sometimes, it is great to have colourful buttonholes, i.e. buttonholes which do not blend in with the cloth. But the effect can be too much. Having the triangle tacks in a contrasting colour isn't overwhelming because they are quite small.

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It's interesting to me that I understand every word, without having to strain or pay particular attention. It goes into my brain almost as if it were in English. Which is unexpected since I've not used German in many years. I was expecting to have to work my brain to understand it.

This guy is very remarkable. Only 26 years-old, but is a fully integrated tailor who is actually reasonably good even at fit. There are other integrated tailors, but they tend to have spent decades to become integrated and even then are really poor in the fit department. I would watch documentaries about them and am just shocked at how amateurish they are at fit. What is more typical is the separation between those who cut and fit, and those who sew. To do both at a high level at 26 is truly remarkable.

I see some weaknesses, but they are really minor. He'll figure them out in no time. I think he will become a towering figure in the German tailoring scene.

His intelligence is reflected even in the way he organised his work space. So rational, so devoid of pomp and pretentions (stagheads, chimneyplaces, leather wingchairs, etc).

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Yesterday, since I was in the vicinity, I dropped into a haberdasher I've not been to in years. It's where I bought my Shozaburo shears 8 years ago. I looked at their wares, and bought a few small items. I sort of have a fascination with knives and scissors and such, so I was attentive to their assortment of cloth shears. They were all Chinese. I asked if they have any Japanese shears. They brought out a Diawood stainless steel with brass handles. RM420. I asked if they have anything between the RM420 and the RM70 of the Chinese stuff.

"Errr, I think we have something at RM200+," I was told. She rummaged in some drawer, and before long plunked a heavy object onto the counter. It's very old stock from decades ago.

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It's a product from Soligen, Germany. Soligen is Germany's cutlery town, much like Sheffield is Britain's. The brand is F.Herder Abraham & Soehne, which started with a certain Juergen Abraham in 1623 who hardened swords during the Thirty Years War. The spade trademark was registered in 1727 by one of his children, Peter Herder. The Herder family name is very common in Soligen, so there are a number of Herders in the cutlery business. They would differentiate themselves through their trademarks.

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F.Herder was a high volume manufacturer of knives and scissors. Its administrative building still stands today, but the adjacent factory has been demolished. It is literally across the road from another world-famous cutlery manufacturer-- J.A. Henckles, which uses the Zwilling trademark. 

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In 1993, F.Herder went into insolvency administration. It came out of insolvency under a new name.

The shears are nowhere as refined as a Shozaburo. It is also quite a bit heavier. I spent some time just now sharpening them, and they are much smoother and sharper now.

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First time trying out glue to prepare the buttonhole. It keeps the buttonhole free of yarn ends sticking out.

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It really results in a very clean buttonhole

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White oak strips selected by the cabinetmaker for my 6'x3' bench top. You think you have to wait a long time for your suit from me? It took this guy a whole month to even lift a finger on my order.

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8 hours ago, roboshar said:

The jacket length for the surgeon’s Sultan looks super. 

But why is the breast pocket very slanty?

It's a "Barchetta" or "Little Boat" pocket. To answer your question- styling purposes.

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The KAI shears arrived. 

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I've actually used these shears before previously in a workshop I still occasionally use for fused jackets. I found the shears so strange then. It looked like paper scissors, felt like paper scissors, but are heavy. However, now that I have one of my own in new condition, I realise that pair, though quite new, has been compromised. The workers there really dont know how to take care of things. Mine feels heavenly and can cut through several layers of 11 oz cloth and canvas as though only air was there. Here next to my Shozaburo.

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